tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-49791086206982715982019-05-21T02:52:44.810-07:00Great Kid BooksA site to help parents learn about great books for their kids ages 4 - 14.Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.comBlogger1069125GreatKidBookshttps://feedburner.google.comSubscribe with GoogleSubscribe with PlusmoSubscribe with The Free DictionarySubscribe with Bitty BrowserSubscribe with NewsAlloySubscribe with Live.comSubscribe with Excite MIXSubscribe with Attensa for OutlookSubscribe with WebwagSubscribe with Podcast ReadySubscribe with FlurrySubscribe with WikioSubscribe with Daily Rotationtag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-85775172143561731042019-04-14T22:48:00.000-07:002019-04-14T22:50:50.298-07:00Forward Me Back To You, by Mitali Perkins: touching story of teens finding their way through trauma, identity and friendship (ages 13-17)<div class="tr_bq">Mitali Perkins' newest YA novel, <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2DcoP6o">Forward Me Back To You</a></b>, pulled me in with characters navigating their way through trauma and secrets. It is a book that wrestles with many heavy topics, yet the story shines with sweet moments and fully developed characters.&nbsp;</div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2DcoP6o"><img border="0" data-original-height="1502" data-original-width="1001" height="320" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-I_T_4sa6Ld4/XLQJLFUvrCI/AAAAAAAATIU/h2JR4bQTVv4_AwAcEzbQmOEfUfFcPFypQCLcBGAs/s320/forward%2Bme%2Bback%2Bto%2Byou.jpg" width="213" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2DcoP6o">Forward Me Back to You</a></b><br />by <a href="https://www.mitaliblog.com/p/forward-me-back-to-you.html">Mitali Perkins</a><br />Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Macmillan, 2019<br /><a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=x6NrDwAAQBAJ&amp;lpg=PP1&amp;pg=PA1#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false" target="_blank">Google Books</a> preview<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2DcoP6o">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1045164862">your local library</a><br />ages 13 - 17<br />*<a href="http://kidmode.me/search/label/best%20new%20book">best new book</a>*</blockquote>The core of the story takes place in Kolkata, India as three teens travel to spend the summer helping an organization supporting survivors of human trafficking. And yet each of them realize that their personal stories, their backstories, impact the way they walk through the world.<br /><br />As the story opens, Katina King struggles to recover from a sexual assault at school by a popular boy. Although Kat fought him off using her training in martial arts, the school authorities don't believe her. In order to help her heal and move forward, her mother sends her to Boston to finish the semester with a family friend, Grandma Vee.<br /><br />I so appreciate the way Perkins brings readers into Kat's point of view. Right from the beginning, she introduces the way Kat sees people classified into types -- canines, felines and birds -- based on the way they act, react and treat others.<br /><blockquote>"Katina King classifies herself as a mountain lion.<br /><br />She might have become a tame cat in a safer world. But when she was eleven, her body changed so fast it turned her into prey. Nothing she could do to stop luring canine eyes, so she’d put on a feral mask since then to prowl the hills of Oakland.<br /><br />Fangs, claws, snarl.<br /><br />They should have kept wolves away, but they didn’t."</blockquote>In Boston, Kat meets Robin (Ravi) Thornton, who's struggling with his own past. Adopted from an orphanage in India, Robin numbs himself to his own pain by keeping the world at a distance. When his church group leader suggests a summer service trip to Kolkata, Robin decides to take the opportunity, in part to see if he can locate his "first mother." Once they are in India, Robin asks to be called Ravi, his original name.<br /><br />The second half of the novel takes place in Kolkata, as Ravi, Kat and Gracie, Ravi's long-time best friend, work to support survivors of human trafficking. Kat and Gracie work in a shelter, while Ravi helps with data entry and trains with a local policeman. Perkins shows the complicated aspects of volunteer-tourism, and yet she also shows clear love for the city of Kolkata and the value of connecting across cultures.<br /><br />Perkins excels at weaving together characters. Main characters and secondary characters have full backstories that create multidimensional, relatable people. The characters of Bontu, Miss Shireen, Kavita and Grandma Vee will stay with me. Perkins explores heavy, important issues of identity, trauma, international adoption and human trafficking, yet the characters' journeys and growth remain central.<br /><br />I especially think teens will be drawn to the way Kat and Ravi move through their pain. They both find it hard to share their stories, and both more naturally retreat within themselves; yet it is through sharing, feeling and connecting that they are able to move forward. I absolutely agree with the way <a href="https://www.readingstyle.net/blog/finding-answers">Barbara Moon</a>&nbsp;describes this novel:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"This search for identity and recovery is a sweeping saga that explores the serious problem of international human trafficking. Gripping storytelling, eye-opening adventure in a faraway city, <b><i>Forward Me Back to You</i></b> packs an emotional gut punch that lingers long after the final page. A story not to be missed."</blockquote>The review copy was kindly sent by the publishers, Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Macmillan. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2019 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=Y7KVGvxLxDg:OxEeIXA3CdA:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=Y7KVGvxLxDg:OxEeIXA3CdA:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=Y7KVGvxLxDg:OxEeIXA3CdA:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/Y7KVGvxLxDg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2019/04/forward-me-back-to-you-by-mitali.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-19885709168732674532019-03-17T21:13:00.000-07:002019-03-17T21:13:45.001-07:00In the Middle of the Night: An interview with Laura Purdie Salas about her writing process (ages 3-8)<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-uQANdJXKMTU/XI8XvPK8-mI/AAAAAAAATDY/25RCjEUNWZEGO2BO3YfjomRlYnoVTVEWgCLcBGAs/s1600/UPDATED%2521_IN%2BTHE%2BMIDDLE%2BOF%2BTHE%2BNIGHT%2Bblog%2Btour%2Bgraphic.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="343" data-original-width="687" height="159" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-uQANdJXKMTU/XI8XvPK8-mI/AAAAAAAATDY/25RCjEUNWZEGO2BO3YfjomRlYnoVTVEWgCLcBGAs/s320/UPDATED%2521_IN%2BTHE%2BMIDDLE%2BOF%2BTHE%2BNIGHT%2Bblog%2Btour%2Bgraphic.jpg" width="320" /></a></div>I'm delighted to celebrate a new poetry book <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2ObEoPK" target="_blank">In the Middle of the Night: Poems from a Wide-Awake House</a></b>, by Laura Purdie Salas. This delightful collection of poems captured my imagination as they&nbsp;describe the adventures of everyday inanimate objects found at night.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2ObEoPK" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1165" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-i5LDeZ9Rvn8/XI8QZmsQbEI/AAAAAAAATCg/1DxVk4r9XJkI7yJSJeF-5rA2-M_zMrwdACLcBGAs/s320/In%2Bthe%2BMiddle%2Bof%2Bthe%2BNight.jpg" width="274" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2ObEoPK" target="_blank">In the Middle of the Night: Poems from a Wide-Awake House</a></b><br />by <a href="https://laurasalas.com/" target="_blank">Laura Purdie Salas</a><br />Wordsong / Highlights, 2019<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2ObEoPK" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1089451552" target="_blank">your local library</a><br />ages 3-8</blockquote>As part of the blog tour celebrating her new book, Laura was kind enough to share about her writing process with me.<br /><br /><b>Mary Ann</b>: I'd love to share with readers a little bit about your writing process.<br /><br /><b>Laura</b>: Thanks so much for being part of the blog tour! Unless I’m writing while traveling, I write on my laptop. I might write individual poems on napkins or my phone, but with a big project like a poetry collection, I do less of that. I write most freely when my fingers can move fast, and I can type much faster than I can write longhand. On July 24, 2012, I wrote in my journal:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">I spent 30 minutes, finally, on Nobody's Looking (my original name for this idea) last night right before bed. I don't know why I keep procrastinating. Maybe because I don't have a super-clear image of the finished project in my head.</blockquote><b>Mary Ann</b>: I can relate to that so much! Procrastination is really difficult to deal with. What did you do when you felt stuck?<br /><br /><b>Laura</b>: One thing that helped me was reading lots of poetry books I love, that were in a style I was trying to capture. That day, I wrote this blog post about using mentor texts: <a href="https://laurasalas.com/writing-for-children/gps-2/" target="_blank">Finding My Writing GPS</a>. Reading these books gave me a new sense of enthusiasm.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-3gGTttFzXtU/XI8V9NrNheI/AAAAAAAATC8/o0c2xIzfVqgsK3Fbf4cgLnXjhCZm-nKfQCLcBGAs/s1600/In%2Bthe%2BMiddle%2Bof%2Bthe%2BNight%2Binterior2.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="583" data-original-width="1000" height="232" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-3gGTttFzXtU/XI8V9NrNheI/AAAAAAAATC8/o0c2xIzfVqgsK3Fbf4cgLnXjhCZm-nKfQCLcBGAs/s400/In%2Bthe%2BMiddle%2Bof%2Bthe%2BNight%2Binterior2.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"Animals on the Go"</td></tr></tbody></table><b>Mary Ann</b>: I love your use of words. "Lion flips. / Monkey snips. Dolphin drums. / Dragon strums." Your poems are so much fun to read aloud as each word takes shape first on my tongue and then in our minds. How do you gather words for a poem?<br /><br /><b>Laura</b>: I collect words on a project by project basis. For example, for a draft of a project I'm currently working on, I wrote in my journal:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">Also want to brainstorm some words, synonyms and phrases for belonging, accepted, trust, valued...things like that. Not to mention, just...good. Enough.<br /><br />belong, fit, like a puzzle piece, believed, traditional, standard, agreed, shouldered, believed, faith, belief, hope, rely, trust, expect, care, protect, guard, depend on, count on, be sure about, worth, price, cost, importance.</blockquote>Those are all just synonyms, but I often make lists of specifically juicy words I come across in my research that I think, <i>Oooh, I want to use that word somehow in my draft</i>.<br /><br /><b>Mary Ann</b>: Our students and teachers use a word wall. Do you have a word wall at home? What is your writing space like?<br /><br /><b>Laura</b>: I love so many words. If I had a word wall, I think our townhome would sag under the weight of it! I love walking while I write, so this is my writing space:<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HCAzhIuzIGs/XI8XFiOPtHI/AAAAAAAATDM/qzuDK9zTAzgOoZOYTEeVdbSUfSm5FJGsACLcBGAs/s1600/Laura%2BPurdie%2BSalas%2Bwriting.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="240" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HCAzhIuzIGs/XI8XFiOPtHI/AAAAAAAATDM/qzuDK9zTAzgOoZOYTEeVdbSUfSm5FJGsACLcBGAs/s320/Laura%2BPurdie%2BSalas%2Bwriting.jpeg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Laura Purdie Salas walking and writing</td></tr></tbody></table><b>Mary Ann</b>: I love the way stuffed animals come to life in this! Do you have a story about a stuffie from her own childhood?<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><br /><b>Laura</b>: What a great question. I have hardly anything from my childhood. Six or seven books, about a dozen photos, and no toys. But I do have Tommy the Turtle. I may originally have “borrowed” him from my big sister, Patty (don’t tell). He has come with me everywhere I’ve ever lived, and I think Tommy would love to have Octopus teach him how to skate!<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-aWfTsxBEfBM/XI8Vv89p1WI/AAAAAAAATC4/-UsUURSW60k7WKyeMaYOJDFW5GsM4xKTwCLcBGAs/s1600/Laura%2Band%2BTommy%2Bthe%2BTurtle.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="1600" height="240" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-aWfTsxBEfBM/XI8Vv89p1WI/AAAAAAAATC4/-UsUURSW60k7WKyeMaYOJDFW5GsM4xKTwCLcBGAs/s320/Laura%2Band%2BTommy%2Bthe%2BTurtle.jpeg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">Laura Purdie Salas and Tommy the Turtle</td></tr></tbody></table>Thank you so much, Laura! Many congratulations on a wonderful book. Here are all of the stops on the blog tour:<br /><ul><li>Monday, 3/11 <a href="https://readingwithmrteut.wordpress.com/2019/03/11/in-the-middle-of-the-night-blog-tour-kickoff-interview-with-laura-purdie-salas-and-giveaway/" target="_blank">Mile High Reading</a></li><li>Tuesday, 3/12 <a href="https://reflectionsontheteche.com/2019/03/12/solc2019-12-in-the-middle-of-the-night/" target="_blank">Reflections on the Teche</a></li><li>Wednesday, 3/13 <a href="http://readingyear.blogspot.com/2019/03/the-middle-of-night-blog-tour-is-here.html" target="_blank">A Year of Reading</a></li><li>Thursday, 3/14 <a href="https://maclibrary.wordpress.com/2019/03/14/in-the-middle-of-the-night-blog-tour-an-interview-with-laura-purdie-salas/" target="_blank">Check It Out</a></li><li>Friday, 3/15 <a href="https://mattforrest.wordpress.com/2019/03/15/poetry-friday-in-the-middle-of-the-night-blog-tour-arrives-here/" target="_blank">Radio, Rhythm &amp; Rhyme</a></li><li>Sunday, 3/17 <a href="https://kidmode.me/" target="_blank">Great Kid Books</a></li><li>Monday, 3/18 <a href="https://jenabenton.com/category/simply-7-interview/" target="_blank">Simply 7 Interview/Jena Benton blog</a></li><li>Tuesday, 3/19 <a href="http://myjuicylittleuniverse.blogspot.com/" target="_blank">My Juicy Little Universe</a></li><li>Wednesday, 3/20 <a href="https://irenelatham.blogspot.com/" target="_blank">Live Your Poem</a></li><li>Thursday, 3/21 <a href="https://readingtothecore.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">Reading to the Core</a></li><li>Friday, 3/22 <a href="http://www.kidlitfrenzy.com/" target="_blank">KidLit Frenzy</a></li><li>Friday, 3/22 <a href="http://beyond%20literacy%20link/" target="_blank">Beyond Literacy Link</a></li></ul>The review copy was kindly sent by the publishers, Highlights Press. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2019 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=Fhb-KYaQWq0:XDo0Lt1WecU:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=Fhb-KYaQWq0:XDo0Lt1WecU:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=Fhb-KYaQWq0:XDo0Lt1WecU:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/Fhb-KYaQWq0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com2http://kidmode.me/2019/03/in-middle-of-night-interview-laura-salas.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-2677345706300542302019-03-10T22:41:00.002-07:002019-03-10T22:41:26.833-07:00Shout, by Laurie Halse Anderson: true story of a survivor who refused to be silenced (ages 13 - 18)As we celebrate Women's History Month, I want to make sure we pay attention to all women's stories. Listening to young women is essential; I especially find women's memoirs powerful when they share about their teenage years. In her powerful new memoir <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2u1o6Qq" target="_blank">Shout</a></b>, award-winning author <a href="http://madwomanintheforest.com/" target="_blank">Laurie Halse Anderson</a> shares her experience as a survivor of rape and advocate for women's rights, but she goes far beyond this, plumbing the impact of her father's PTSD, her mother's silence, and the rape culture that surrounds us. I highly recommend this powerful, personal reflection.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2u1o6Qq" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1542" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KVKSo47XeOA/XIXp4039qRI/AAAAAAAATBU/IZFnuqxFj8QMgP7V_p2H9wZw9gAPVwLjACLcBGAs/s320/shout%2Bcover.jpg" width="207" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2u1o6Qq" target="_blank">Shout</a></b><br />by <a href="http://madwomanintheforest.com/" target="_blank">Laurie Halse Anderson</a><br />Viking / Penguin Random House, 2019<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2u1o6Qq" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1080901220" target="_blank">your public library</a><br />ages 13 - 18<br />*<a href="http://kidmode.me/search/label/best%20new%20book" target="_blank">best new book</a>*</blockquote>Twenty years ago, Laurie Halse Anderson's <a href="https://amzn.to/2NXI9It" target="_blank"><b>Speak</b></a>&nbsp;helped give survivors of sexual violence a voice, showing how Melinda coped with the trauma of her rape the summer before her freshman year. Anderson begins <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2u1o6Qq" target="_blank">Shout</a></b> saying:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"Finding my courage to speak up twenty-five years after I was raped, writing <a href="https://amzn.to/2NXI9It" target="_blank"><b>Speak</b></a>, and talking with countless survivors of sexual violence made me who I am today. This book shows how that happened."&nbsp;</blockquote>Writing in free verse, Anderson explores the impact of her father's PTSD from WWII and her mother's silence in a household filled with alcohol-fueled tension. She explains the rape she survived at age 13, and how that led to a downward spiral as high school began. And she shows her recovery as she discovered her voice and her love of language as an exchange student in Denmark.<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"In Denmark, in Scandinavia, across Europe<br />memories of World War II ache like a scar<br />does when the weather changes or a storm draws near<br />old countries are riddled with battle wounds<br />that split open, bleed, and cause new pain if not cared for,<br />just like us<br /><br />scars may look stronger than unwounded skin,<br />but they're not<br />once broken, we're easily hurt again, or worse<br />the temptation is to hide behind shields,<br />play defense, drown ourselves in sorrow<br />or drug our way to haunted oblivion<br />until death erases hope"</blockquote>For me, much of the story's power comes in those ah-ha moments, recognizing hard truths I've learned, moments that speak to my core. This is a story that will mean something different to each reader. Above all else, it will create a conversation--perhaps just two sides of your brain talking to each other, or perhaps among friends.<br /><br />I want to hold onto her advice for us, especially for young people. She does not sugar-coat her life, or her advice to young people. Take one step at a time.<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"Trying to figure out what you want to do,<br />who you want to be, is messy as hell; the best<br />anyone can hope for is to figure out<br />the next step."</blockquote>Anderson speaks raw truth about the impact of sexual violence and the importance of supporting survivors. Shout is also a powerful call to action, encouraging survivors to find their voice and reminding all of us that we have a responsibility to continue the conversation. Her poetry uses metaphors and similes with graceful, evocative power. The poem "shame turned inside out" is one of my favorites:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b>shame turned inside out</b><br />"Sisters of the torn shirts.<br /><br />Sisters of the chase<br />around the desk,<br />casting couch, hotel<br />room, file cabinet....<br /><br />Sisters fishing<br />one by one<br />in the lake of shame ...<br /><br />Sisters, drop<br />everything. Walk<br />away from the lake, leaning<br />on each other's shoulders<br />when you need<br />the support. Feel the contractions<br />of another truth ready<br />to be born: shame<br />turned<br />inside out<br />is rage."</blockquote>Laurie Halse Anderson is in the middle of <a href="http://www.penguinteen.com/event/shout-tour-with-laurie-halse-anderson/" target="_blank">her tour for Shout</a>. See if she's coming to a town near you. She is a powerful speaker.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.penguinteen.com/event/shout-tour-with-laurie-halse-anderson/" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="512" data-original-width="1024" height="160" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-o1acW72me9A/XIXytnsGNFI/AAAAAAAATBg/S-pnAwD6aGMcrviITbuMLD9fIrmWR1GrQCLcBGAs/s320/Shout%2Btour.jpg" width="320" /></a></div>The review copy was kindly sent by the publishers, Viking Books, an imprint of Penguin Random House. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2019 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=BfTxqnMQcfU:FIbmvn5CSVU:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=BfTxqnMQcfU:FIbmvn5CSVU:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=BfTxqnMQcfU:FIbmvn5CSVU:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/BfTxqnMQcfU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2019/03/shout-by-laurie-halse-anderson-true.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-88339030415080339432019-02-25T10:36:00.000-08:002019-02-25T10:37:53.527-08:00Biddy Mason Speaks Up, by Arisa White and Laura Atkins: a powerful biography of an early California woman fighting for justice (ages 10-14)As we celebrate Black History, it is crucial we include many people's stories, not just the ones we know well. When our students study California history, we must bring to light the stories of African Americans who helped shape our state. <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2GZiD4g" target="_blank">Biddy Mason Speaks Up</a></b> is a terrific addition to help children learn about an influential African American woman in Los Angeles's early history.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2GZiD4g" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1000" data-original-width="777" height="320" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-E5pS5_QyX80/XHQkhea62aI/AAAAAAAAS9Q/ki-y9GeEti87KTlZftqTJGKBBsgJCBRfQCLcBGAs/s320/biddy%2Bmason%2Bspeaks%2Bup.jpg" width="248" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2GZiD4g" target="_blank">Biddy Mason Speaks Up</a></b><br />by <a href="https://arisawhite.com/" target="_blank">Arisa White</a> and <a href="http://www.lauraatkins.com/" target="_blank">Laura Atkins</a><br />illustrated by <a href="https://www.lfreemanart.com/" target="_blank">Laura Freeman</a><br /><a href="http://www.fightingforjusticeseries.com/" target="_blank">Fighting for Justice</a> series<br />Heyday, 2019<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2GZiD4g" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1028608813" target="_blank">Your local library</a><br />ages 10-14<br />*<a href="http://kidmode.me/search/label/best%20new%20book" target="_blank">best new book</a>*&nbsp;</blockquote>Biddy Mason was an African-American healer, midwife, real estate entrepreneur and philanthropist who lived in Los Angeles from 1851 until 1891. Born enslaved in 1818, Biddy was brought to California by the Smith family as one of their slaves, when they moved west as part of the Mormon settlement.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MzUYJZ53DC0/XHQnS0Ou4iI/AAAAAAAAS9c/HIhZs2-Tp4cvhxkw2q3284wOfnJ51kB7QCLcBGAs/s1600/biddy%2Bmason%2Binterior1.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="642" data-original-width="1000" height="256" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-MzUYJZ53DC0/XHQnS0Ou4iI/AAAAAAAAS9c/HIhZs2-Tp4cvhxkw2q3284wOfnJ51kB7QCLcBGAs/s400/biddy%2Bmason%2Binterior1.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"Even though Granny<br />isn't allowed to read<br />or write, she knows<br />how to read plants."</td></tr></tbody></table>Arisa White and Laura Atkins weave together Biddy's story with well-researched historical information, giving young readers the historical context for her life. Free verse poems, which enable&nbsp; readers to feel that they are getting to know Biddy in a personal way, are interspersed with historical information on&nbsp;slavery and midwifery, plantation life and economy, migration, the struggle for freedom, and life as a free black person.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-iYAD84R-LBQ/XHQnl4M31AI/AAAAAAAAS9k/0AffvmHgVxwTpSMwB3bvXv5QzF1jMtA2gCLcBGAs/s1600/biddy%2Bmason%2Binterior2.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="642" data-original-width="1000" height="256" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-iYAD84R-LBQ/XHQnl4M31AI/AAAAAAAAS9k/0AffvmHgVxwTpSMwB3bvXv5QzF1jMtA2gCLcBGAs/s400/biddy%2Bmason%2Binterior2.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"Biddy probably grew up on a cotton plantation. Cotton, a major cash crop, was grown throughout the Cotton Belt states."</td></tr></tbody></table>"The record we call 'history' does not tell everyone's story." The voices of ordinary people, especially those who were enslaved or subjugated, were rarely recorded or preserved. When the authors Arisa White and Laura Atkins started writing the biography of Biddy Mason, they faced a challenge: how to accurately portray her story when historical records were scant. They write in the introduction:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"Writing this book was a creative act of repairing the historical record, of imagining Biddy Mason's life based on all the information and stories we could gather. We believe that we are all better when we hear everyone's stories, especially those that have been silenced."</blockquote>Very little is recorded about Biddy's early years, and so the authors "had to imagine this time in Biddy's life using historical research, 'slave narratives' (written accounts by enslaved people after escaping slavery), and audio interviews with people who lived during the same period and in similar regions." I appreciate how they explain their process and how they used this information to paint a fuller picture.<br /><br />After 4 years in California, Biddy's owner Robert Smith, planned to move to Texas in 1855. While California was a free state, slavery was legal in Texas. Local sheriffs intervened and took Biddy and her family away from Smith. I appreciate how clearly the text breaks this confusing situation down:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"Even though Biddy was legally free, she had to rely on her community to support her in resisting Robert Smith and the institution of slavery..."</blockquote>The free verse poems remind me of Ashley Bryan's masterful <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2H2QOIm" target="_blank">Freedom Over Me</a></b>. As Bryan did, White and Atkins used historical records to paint a full picture of ordinary people. This brings to life the stories of Black Americans who helped shape our country.<br /><br />I wonder if young students will realize that the scenes in the free verse poems did not necessarily occur, or that the authors created the character of Granny Ellen. While the authors are transparent about their process, I wonder if it will be clear to young readers. I see this book as a blend of historical fiction and historical reporting. Detailed source notes show the extensive investigations that went into writing this book.<br /><br />Illustrations copyright ©2019 Laura Freeman, shared by permission of the publishers. The review copy was purchased for our school library. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2019 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=L5n7VlxWs7o:0fgmT5SOEwA:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=L5n7VlxWs7o:0fgmT5SOEwA:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=L5n7VlxWs7o:0fgmT5SOEwA:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/L5n7VlxWs7o" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com1http://kidmode.me/2019/02/biddy-mason-speaks-up-by-arisa-white.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-65810839754308412802019-02-13T21:59:00.000-08:002019-02-17T11:08:34.077-08:00The Roots of Rap: Hip Hop & Childhood Meet, by Carole Boston Weatherford (ages 4-14)<blockquote class="tr_bq">"Bro!<br />This is actually kinda cool -- all about the artists who shaped hip hop.<br />Oh, it rhymes!<br />Is this supposed to be a song? a rap?<br />Bro, that's hecka cool!"<br />&nbsp; &nbsp;-- Aya, 9th grade, reading <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2X47vsH" target="_blank">The Roots of Rap</a></b></blockquote>My high school students have loved reading <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2X47vsH" target="_blank">The Roots of Rap</a></b>. Frank Morrison's dynamic illustrations pull them in, and then Carole Boston Weatherford's text lays down the knowledge. This is a terrific new picture book to share with young readers all the way through high schoolers. I'm honored to have Carole share a little about how rap has inspired her.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2X47vsH" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1000" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9U88Es45EGM/XGT6x1uihII/AAAAAAAAS7Y/GGveZsp3MwM1rPaRmQFxoMHOZgahczXSACLcBGAs/s320/roots%2Bof%2Brap.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2X47vsH" target="_blank">The Roots of Rap: 16 Bars on the 4 Pillars of Hip Hop</a></b><br />by Carole Boston Weatherford<br />illustrated by Frank Morrison<br />Simon &amp; Schuster / Little Bee, 2019<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2X47vsH" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1025360230" target="_blank">Your local library</a><br />ages 4-14</blockquote>“Hip-hop and rap aren’t often featured in children’s books,” Swizz Beatz writes in his introduction. And yet, this music speaks to our children, fills their lives. With this picture book, Weatherford helps children see that their music springs from a long tradition of poetry and music. As Weatherford writes, "hip-hop is poetry at its most powerful."<br /><br />I am honored to have Carole Boston Weatherford here to share a little about how hip-hop and rap have inspired her, and what planted the seeds for this picture book.<br /><br />THE ROOTS OF RAP: HIP HOP &amp; CHILDHOOD MEET<br />reflection by Carole Boston Weatherford<br /><br />Illustrator Frank Morrison’s oil paintings in the book have a vibrancy and vitality that borders on virtuosity. He honors hip hop legends and luminaries and shows the four pillars of graffiti, b-boying/breakdancing, emceeing and deejaying. I linger over the spreads showing youthful expression through hip hop, a culture young people are inventing.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-FjAUFjqFA0E/XGT93pY_1zI/AAAAAAAAS7k/kHQzWHOUoUEHYaxSmhQJVp4nG0WIez8PQCLcBGAs/s1600/roots%2Bof%2Brap%2Binterior1.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1411" data-original-width="1397" height="320" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-FjAUFjqFA0E/XGT93pY_1zI/AAAAAAAAS7k/kHQzWHOUoUEHYaxSmhQJVp4nG0WIez8PQCLcBGAs/s320/roots%2Bof%2Brap%2Binterior1.jpg" width="316" /></a></div>Just as my son and daughter (now young adults) reintroduced me in the 1990s to children’s books, they also hipped me to the hip hop of the day on BET and urban radio. At Super Jam, my first rap concert, I tagged along as chaperone to my daughter and her friend. Was I in for a shock!? Unlike the jazz and R&amp;B concerts that I attended, there were no bands at Super Jam--only a deejay scratching and the emcees spitting rhymes.<br /><br />Then, there were the CDs that son and daughter bought. They’d mute explicit lyrics, so as not to offend their mother. Although their censorship meant that I rarely heard entire songs, I found much to like—especially cuts featuring choruses of children. Some of those pulsate with positivity. Here are a few of my favorites:<br /><ul><li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RW34u1KxGC4" target="_blank">It’s a Hard Knock Life</a> – Jay-Z</li><li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvVfgvHucRY" target="_blank">I Can</a> – Nas</li><li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKyRBCW-Rcg" target="_blank">Mind Your Manners</a> – Chiddy Bang</li></ul>Enjoy this trailer for Roots of Rap:<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="YOUTUBE-iframe-video" data-thumbnail-src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/liW-9QLNWBs/0.jpg" frameborder="0" height="266" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/liW-9QLNWBs?feature=player_embedded" width="320"></iframe></div>Thank you, Carole, for sharing a little peek into what led to this book. Illustrations copyright ©2019 Frank Morrison, shared by permission of the publishers. The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Simon &amp; Schuster / Little Bee. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2019 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=X3C7l5KKXfY:YbCDyU6aIsU:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=X3C7l5KKXfY:YbCDyU6aIsU:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=X3C7l5KKXfY:YbCDyU6aIsU:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/X3C7l5KKXfY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com1http://kidmode.me/2019/02/the-roots-of-rap.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-29722764895821194422019-02-05T22:09:00.000-08:002019-02-05T22:09:24.437-08:00 Carter Reads the Newspaper, by Deborah Hopkinson -- important and timely picture book biography (ages 6-10)It is essential that we teach Black History throughout the year, especially celebrating Black History Month in February. And yet, do we stop to ask who had the idea to create this special celebration? I highly recommend sharing Carter Reads the Newspaper with your children, and beginning a conversation about why it is so important to honor and learn about Black history.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2t8Uy2J" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="894" data-original-width="1000" height="286" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hAgMCasnk90/XFpqwQdIOFI/AAAAAAAAS5w/fooLhSWqjjU2AySz7m8R0aMUny5zTPoOwCLcBGAs/s320/Carter%2BReads%2Bthe%2BNewspaper.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2t8Uy2J" target="_blank">Carter Reads the Newspaper</a></b><br />by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Don Tate<br />Peachtree, 2019<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2t8Uy2J" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1043307240" target="_blank">Your local library</a><br />ages 6-10<br />*<a href="https://kidmode.me/search/label/best%20new%20book" target="_blank">best new book</a>*</blockquote>Carter Woodson is known as the “father of Black history,” tirelessly encouraging others to study the history of Blacks in America. He was the second black American to receive a PhD in history from Harvard, after W.E.B. DuBois. In February 1926, Woodson created Negro History Week in Washington, D.C.<br /><br />Deborah Hopkinson helps young readers see Carter Woodson's journey, helping them relate to his passion for learning. Carter was born on a small farm, and his parents had both been born into slavery. His father made sure Carter went to school and believed in staying informed about the world. Because his father couldn't read, he asked Carter to read the newspaper to him. <br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LoNVVWbTT98/XFp48rbFoGI/AAAAAAAAS6I/NGw-r9s381c_0P9grfzki1aKhiJHTmfMQCLcBGAs/s1600/Carter%2BReads%2Bthe%2BNewspaper%2Binterior1.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="437" data-original-width="1000" height="173" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LoNVVWbTT98/XFp48rbFoGI/AAAAAAAAS6I/NGw-r9s381c_0P9grfzki1aKhiJHTmfMQCLcBGAs/s400/Carter%2BReads%2Bthe%2BNewspaper%2Binterior1.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"Carter was born on a small farm in Virginia in 1875, <br />ten years after the end of the Civil War."</td></tr></tbody></table>When Carter took a coal mining job at age 16, he was inspired by a Civil War Veteran he met there, Oliver Jones, who invited the other workers to come to his home as a reading room. Once again, Carter read aloud to others, informing them what was in the paper. He saw that Oliver was an educated man, even though he could not read or write. And he saw the power of the men's commitment to freedom, equality and knowledge.<br /><br />After three years working in the mines, Carter returned home to complete high school, go to college and become a teacher. At the age of 37, he earned a Ph.D. in history from Harvard University. "Carter was the first and only Black American whose parents had been slaves to receive a doctorate in history."<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-QumbG1fQPrU/XFp2P4znLvI/AAAAAAAAS58/ISeYez9b03Y0eL2i-0RmftmObu6PHNCMACLcBGAs/s1600/Carter-Reads-the-Newspaper_Poster.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1067" data-original-width="1600" height="213" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-QumbG1fQPrU/XFp2P4znLvI/AAAAAAAAS58/ISeYez9b03Y0eL2i-0RmftmObu6PHNCMACLcBGAs/s320/Carter-Reads-the-Newspaper_Poster.jpg" width="320" /></a></div>Deborah Hopkinson helps young readers see the power of knowledge and the importance of sharing that knowledge, and she makes Carter a relatable character. I especially appreciate how she focuses on the challenges Woodson faced as a young boy, and what he learned from his family and mentors.<br /><br />Don Tate's illustrations use warm earth-tones tones and the stylized characters convey the humanity of the situations without making the frightening moments overwhelming.<br /><br />I highly recommend adding this book to your school or home library. It helps begin the conversation about why we celebrate Black History Month. For adults, I also found the following essay very informative: <a href="https://nmaahc.si.edu/blog-post/knowing-past-opens-door-future-continuing-importance-black-history-month" target="_blank">Knowing the Past Opens the Door to the Future The Continuing Importance of Black History Month</a>, from the <b>National Museum of African American History and Culture</b>.<br /><br />Illustrations copyright ©2019 Don Tate, shared by permission of the publishers. The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Peachtree. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2019 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=tT_eZMiqQfY:MnvVNgeWI_c:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=tT_eZMiqQfY:MnvVNgeWI_c:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=tT_eZMiqQfY:MnvVNgeWI_c:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/tT_eZMiqQfY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2019/02/carter-reads-newspaper-by-deborah.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-703573614251486952019-01-17T22:04:00.002-08:002019-01-17T22:04:29.969-08:00Memphis, Martin and the Mountaintop: The Sanitation Strike of 1968, by Alice Faye Duncan (ages 8-12)As we get ready to celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, I want to share a powerful new book about his work. Alice Fay Duncan's powerful picture book gives context for King's work, helps explain his assassination, and provides inspiration to keep dreaming big.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2T8mRcU" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1261" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-QwMMF0TVS2w/XEFfIi0o3PI/AAAAAAAAS3Y/Elfc6UwCCVk2o0OW5TyrFTZTMzRHpHMyQCLcBGAs/s320/Memphis%252C%2BMartin%2Band%2Bthe%2BMountaintop.jpg" width="253" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2T8mRcU" target="_blank">Memphis, Martin and the Mountaintop: The Sanitation Strike of 1968</a></b><br />by Alice Faye Duncan, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie<br />Calkins Creek / Highlights, 2018<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2T8mRcU" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1049711418" target="_blank">your local library</a><br />ages 8-12<br />*<a href="https://kidmode.me/search/label/best%20new%20book" target="_blank">best new book</a>*</blockquote>We often talk about Dr. King's legacy leading nonviolent protests and fighting for civil rights, but I'm not sure we talk enough about his commitment to fight for workers' rights for fair wages and better working conditions.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9wQniHBXCT4/XEFhAlk9uAI/AAAAAAAAS3k/mB_a7RniAeMRDmhWLbHA8ZW0k8MQSa7agCLcBGAs/s1600/Memphis%252C%2BMartin%2Binterior1.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="647" data-original-width="1000" height="258" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9wQniHBXCT4/XEFhAlk9uAI/AAAAAAAAS3k/mB_a7RniAeMRDmhWLbHA8ZW0k8MQSa7agCLcBGAs/s400/Memphis%252C%2BMartin%2Binterior1.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"Men, women and children contributed to the strike in 1968. Whole families sacrificed their comforts. They suffered for the cause. However, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. paid the highest cost. He gave his life to the struggle for freedom and justice."</td></tr></tbody></table>Duncan brings young readers into this story centering it on Lorraine Jackson, whose father was a striking sanitation worker. Duncan bases her character on Dr. Almella Starks-Umoja, whose father helped organize the strike. The author deftly moves between helping readers connect to Lorraine and providing information about the bigger issues at stake.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VL1mr1meKVQ/XEFhjMnHALI/AAAAAAAAS3s/nJ5M6pvnuTkZScd19BZOAunHasiHXM6aQCLcBGAs/s1600/Memphis%252C%2BMartin%2Binterior2.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="647" data-original-width="1000" height="258" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VL1mr1meKVQ/XEFhjMnHALI/AAAAAAAAS3s/nJ5M6pvnuTkZScd19BZOAunHasiHXM6aQCLcBGAs/s400/Memphis%252C%2BMartin%2Binterior2.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"I remember Memphis and legions of noblemen.<br />I remember broken glass and the voice of a fallen King."</td></tr></tbody></table>As the story begins, we learn about the sanitation workers' strike and the tragic deaths of two black garbagemen because of old, unsafe equipment. "Daddy told Mama, 'It ain't right to die like that.' Mama shook her head, and I saw a new storm rising up. I saw it in their eyes." This detail helps young readers feel the tension and understand the injustices. Throughout, Duncan highlights the dedicated efforts of community and the personal cost of striking.<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"My daddy marched in that number. He marched for better pay. He marched for decent treatment. My daddy marched for me."</blockquote>Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came to Memphis to help the striking men, inspiring them to keep fighting for better pay and working conditions. Through young Lorraine's voice, Duncan tells about King's "Poor People's Crusade" to fight for the working poor, using the Memphis strike to draw national attention to the larger problems.<br /><br />I especially appreciate Duncan's poetic language throughout, both in her prose and poems:<br /><ul><li>"But as Daddy's soles wore think on his mountain climb, there came a spark of light. Good news filled the air."</li><li>"Since Martin had conquered giants in the valley of injustice, Reverend Lawson believed his powerful friend could help the striking men."</li><li>"I was there on that stormy night Dr. King returned. Clouds blotted out stars in the Memphis sky. Wind whipped through the bending trees."</li></ul>Illustrations copyright ©2018 R. Gregory Christie, shared by permission of the publishers. The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Calkins Creek, an imprint of Highlights. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2019 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=gf6W99waYRM:K1A9gV1hfZs:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=gf6W99waYRM:K1A9gV1hfZs:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=gf6W99waYRM:K1A9gV1hfZs:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/gf6W99waYRM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com1http://kidmode.me/2019/01/memphis-martin-and-mountaintop.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-45225671972550639952018-12-19T22:12:00.002-08:002018-12-19T22:12:26.586-08:00Ten graphic novels to read again & again (ages 8-15)Graphic novels have hooked many kids on reading. Kids find their favorites, reading them again and again, but I also love to encourage my students to read widely. I also encourage parents to read aloud graphic novels with their kids -- these stories are full of things to talk about and enjoy together.<br /><br />Here are ten of my favorite graphic novels--some are silly, some are out of this world, and some will make you think and wonder. Check out my <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/1610575?shelf=graphic-novels" target="_blank">Graphic Novels</a> shelf on <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/1610575?shelf=graphic-novels" target="_blank"><b>Goodreads</b></a> for more. All of them have terrific characters and stories that make you want to keep reading.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2S8Vnn6" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1500" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hMVcwcLTgDE/XBstAbf_g4I/AAAAAAAASzI/53A5ERX815ELsyMGBKf7vjU2jZp7alWhwCLcBGAs/s200/amulet%2B1.jpg" width="133" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2S8Vnn6" target="_blank">Amulet</a></b> <b>series</b>, by Kazu Kibuishi: This series combines mystery, adventure and fantasy as Emily and her younger brother search for their mother, captured in an alternate universe. Em and Navin follow their mother into an underground world full of demons, robots, and talking animals. A favorite series with its epic fantasy and adventure. (<i>ages 9-14</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2UVZmVT" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1347" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-GDUuKem_5HE/XBstDlej2aI/AAAAAAAASzM/vTblGQmFUUkWywfG3Kk54qspnr4mDTISACLcBGAs/s200/baby-sitter%2527s%2Bclub%2B1.jpg" width="148" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Lq0BZ6" target="_blank">The Baby-Sitters Club</a></b> <b>series</b>, by Ann M. Martin, illustrated by Raina Telgemeier and Gale Galligan. These graphic novel adaptations add energy and humor to Ann Martin’s classic Baby Sitters Club series. Four best friends help each other deal with everything from crabby toddlers, enormous dogs and prank calls. With relatable characters and straight-forward plots, these make a great entry into graphic novels for developing readers. Definitely check out the <a href="https://amzn.to/2R7iEbL" target="_blank">two new books in this series</a>, just released this year. (<i>ages 7-12</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QK7F91" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1000" data-original-width="749" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-7alOVyOg4PU/XBstGxHEFSI/AAAAAAAASzQ/MwBRLRuOHMQSfoAPXBXOyugzZ-yRpbBhQCLcBGAs/s200/giants%2Bbeware.jpg" width="149" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QK7F91" target="_blank">Giants Beware!</a></b>, by Jorge Aguirre, illustrated by Rafael Rosado: Claudette, a feisty warrior-in-training, is determined to follow her father's footsteps and slay a giant. Never mind that she's tiny, hotheaded, and a girl--she is absolutely sure she's perfect for the job. Aguirre and Rosado weave in surprises, tension and plot twists throughout the story. Best of all, Claudette constantly defies the expectations society sets for her. (<i>ages 8-12</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2LscdL7" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="899" data-original-width="600" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-aYrAC5W7Utk/XBstJ7II2oI/AAAAAAAASzU/rJSgcYDmDCMOT0250W0FFYibKzxYi0G_QCLcBGAs/s200/el%2Bdeafo.jpg" width="133" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2LscdL7" target="_blank">El Deafo</a></b>, by Cece Bell: When she was four years old, cartoonist Cece Bell became severely deaf after she contracted meningitis. This delightful, heartfelt memoir shares her journey through school, searching for friends, trying to fit in and dealing with her deafness. She mixes warmth and humor with complex issues. (<i>ages 8-12</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2LrVkAp" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="487" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4zakmnjI70Y/XBstM2j5OYI/AAAAAAAASzY/njtu-HzvSswBzszFLMBqjWE06IJcHBpbACLcBGAs/s200/hilo.jpg" width="135" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2LrVkAp" target="_blank">Hilo</a></b> <b>series</b>, by Judd Winick: D.J. Lim’s life turns from ordinary to exciting when he discovers Hilo, an extraterrestrial boy wearing nothing but silver underpants. This story is full of action and humor, as Hilo and D.J. battle robots and giant insects intent on destroying Hilo’s home planet. (<i>ages 8-12</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2Cprb1B" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1416" data-original-width="1001" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-OUdCiznKckE/XBstRqy2XfI/AAAAAAAASzc/JfICIb9HalsMndJCx8UEn0S5eH6p_OKDwCLcBGAs/s200/The%2BPrince%2Band%2Bthe%2BDressmaker.jpg" width="140" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Cprb1B" target="_blank">The Prince and the Dressmaker</a></b>, by Jen Wang: Prince Sebastian feels comfortable identifying both male and female, often wearing dresses and going out as his alter ego, Lady Crystallia. When he hires Frances, a young seamstress, to make him a wardrobe of boldly beautiful, dazzling dresses, Frances hesitates at first, but they soon discover a shared passion for fashion. Incorporating the feel of classic fairytales, Wang creates a story that revolves around friendship, following your dreams and speaking your truth. (ages 10-15)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2CqlKQh" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="940" data-original-width="600" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-xK0K3eSxEfY/XBstYURYu3I/AAAAAAAASzo/R5IgrojySJsxj9emUXwJXGlyLARAUfIKwCLcBGAs/s200/princeless.jpg" width="127" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2CqlKQh" target="_blank">Princeless</a></b> <b>series</b>, by Jeremy Whitley, illustrated by M. Goodwin: When Princess Adrienne’s parents lock her away in a castle guarded by a dragon to await rescue by a prince, she decides to take matters into her own hands. I love this feisty heroine--we have so few stories with characters of color, where race isn’t an issue. Readers are able to enjoy classic fairy tale setting in this graphic novel, while turning so many stereotypes and tropes on their heads. (<i>ages 8-12</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2ByrtS2" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="480" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-T4M7BDKRsKE/XBstbl8S-BI/AAAAAAAASzw/5W_Y7Ok9GWgwibRGP0I3wiSglKbQkCgEwCLcBGAs/s200/roller%2Bgirl.jpg" width="133" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2ByrtS2" target="_blank">Roller Girl</a></b>, by Victoria Jamieson: Astrid joins a roller derby boot camp the summer before middle school, making new friends and navigating this rough-and-tumble sport. My students love the way Astrid deals with friendship issues and discovers her own strength and stamina. (<i>ages 9-13</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2UZQ7nU" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1406" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Oi7Bm9FWy-0/XBstePGx3uI/AAAAAAAASz0/pqsobEWb7ZokJVvEafxstTxac84Vk3FmACLcBGAs/s200/secret%2Bcoders.jpg" width="141" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2UZQ7nU" target="_blank">Secret Coders</a>&nbsp;series</b>, by Gene Luen Yang, illustrated by Mike Holmes: Hopper isn’t sure she’s going to like her new school, especially with its creepy birds and crazy janitor, but things turn around as she and her new friends use logic and computer programming to discover the school’s secrets. Kids love the way they’re drawn into figuring out logic puzzles right alongside Hopper. (<i>ages 8-12</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2S6qGz6" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="836" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-zQgQMZNuQBI/XBstiztwAvI/AAAAAAAASz8/zenc3gG8jMYsWYimHoeyADLKNOWnmZg2wCLcBGAs/s200/smile.jpg" width="138" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2S6qGz6" target="_blank">Smile</a></b>, by Raina Telgemeier: Raina Telgemeier’s memoirs <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2S6qGz6" target="_blank">Smile</a></b> and <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2S6qGz6" target="_blank">Sisters</a></b> are absolute favorites. She draws readers in with her relatable situations and humor, creating a real bond as she reflects on family relationships, friendship dramas and the pressures tweens face at school and at home. This remains one of my family's all-time favorite read alouds. (<i>ages 8-14</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2BxD8k8" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="802" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-fS6Xk1nh9AQ/XBstmgEYw3I/AAAAAAAAS0A/2DkPXKlZWqUUrwimo4MwgjgfI_PuvAkYgCLcBGAs/s200/The%2BWitch%2BBoy.jpg" width="133" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2BxD8k8" target="_blank">The Witch Boy</a></b>, by Molly Ostertag: This graphic novel will appeal to readers with its magical setting and strong protagonist. In Aster's village, there are very clear expectations: girls will learn witchcraft and spells, while boys will learn to become shapeshifters. Yet Aster longs to learn spells and is not interested in the other boy's aggressive play. When several boys go missing, Aster tries to use his developing magical abilities to solve the mystery. I especially appreciated the way Aster questions society's gender expectations and stays true to himself. A delightful graphic novel -- I'm looking forward to reading the sequel, <b>The Hidden Witch</b>, which has just come out. (ages 8-12)<br /><br />If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=gpfvmsYTD1Y:mLDaic4kNtU:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=gpfvmsYTD1Y:mLDaic4kNtU:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=gpfvmsYTD1Y:mLDaic4kNtU:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/gpfvmsYTD1Y" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-graphic-novels.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-23513374396509989882018-12-17T22:53:00.000-08:002018-12-17T22:53:26.793-08:00Ten funny books to get you laughing (ages 4-13)We all like doing the things we have fun with. Psychoanalysts might call this the "Pleasure Principle," but I call it common sense. So how do we help our kids discover the fun in reading? Here are ten books that tickle my funny bone, especially when reading them aloud with kids.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2rGc265" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="487" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-UqhbAu1e9ZU/XBiWHmRglNI/AAAAAAAASxQ/uzYNTVk-XMgeIS8_s8bnQfVpMXecT2kFgCLcBGAs/s200/alvin%2Bho.jpg" width="135" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2rGc265" target="_blank">Alvin Ho: Allergic to Girls, School, and Other Scary Things</a></b>, by Lenore Look: Asian-American second grader Alvin Ho is afraid of everything: elevators, tunnels, girls, and, most of all, <i>school</i>. He’s so afraid of school that, while he’s there, he never, ever, says a word. This first book in the series is full of everyday adventures and misadventures -- from trying to get chicken pox, to hanging from a tree branch in a desperate attempt to grow taller. A great read aloud. <i>(ages 6-10)</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2LlHfUW" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="947" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-GWSstZW6B-M/XBiWOwo9cwI/AAAAAAAASxU/f-CHFnJQ-4QTcHwJJYKf2hTcmCoX6pbQACLcBGAs/s200/bad%2Bguys.jpg" width="157" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2LlHfUW" target="_blank">Bad Guys</a></b>, by Aaron Blabey: Mr Wolf decides that he's fed up with always being the "bad guy," so he persuades Mr. Shark, Mr. Piranha &amp; Mr. Snake that they need to do nice things for a change. The want-to-be good guys try hard to shed their carnivorous ways, rescuing a stranded kitty who's terrified of their point teeth. Kids are loving the hilarious antics, exaggerated illustrations and slapstick humor in this chapter book. <i>(ages 6-10)</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2CknMkU" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1478" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-l0prr4Y6b-E/XBiWoq8aUMI/AAAAAAAASxg/lfnR-pFMqWQbIpFG7_740ZKod7wCmBNigCLcBGAs/s200/dog%2Bman.jpeg" width="135" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2CknMkU" target="_blank">Dog Man</a></b>, by Dav Pilkey: Kids can't get enough of George and Harold, and their superhero creation Dog Man. Originally of Captain Underpants fame, George &amp; Harold show how Dog Man, with the head of a dog on the body of a police officer, battles crime and saves the day. Kids love the silliness, the explosions and fight scenes, and the encouragement to create their own outlandish stories. <i>(ages 6-10)</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2BwgTuS" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="470" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9anwUSy65g8/XBiW659uV0I/AAAAAAAASxs/Aj19FdHii_Q2aQcyoGsvf9fVQw7H0rRTwCLcBGAs/s200/dory.jpg" width="130" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2BwgTuS" target="_blank">Dory Fantasmagory</a></b>, by Abby Hanlon: Dory (called Rascal by her family) wants to play with her big brother and sister, but they complain that she's a pest. They try to scare her with a story about the witch Mrs. Gobble Gracker. Dory creates outlandish tales with her imaginary friend, tricks Mrs. Gobble Gracker and wins over her siblings. Families will recognize themselves in Dory's attention-getting strategies, her mom's exasperation or her siblings' bickering. A joyful, funny celebration of imagination and resilience.&nbsp;<i>(ages 6-10)</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2EAZzca" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="535" data-original-width="415" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-CW0xmJ8p7Vg/XBiXK1zmkKI/AAAAAAAASx4/nkQp7i6KZIceli0-HTTVkyi4jN86Oz0UACLcBGAs/s200/forgive%2Bme.jpg" width="155" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2EAZzca" target="_blank">Forgive Me, I Meant to Do It: False Apology Poems</a></b>, by Gail Carson Levine: Using William Carlos Williams's poem "This Is Just to Say" as her starting point, Levine spins a series of playful un-sorry poems. She uses famous characters like Snow White, Humpty Dumpty, the Little Engine that Could and Barbie to twist expectations and create laughs. "I, Rapunzel,/ and not the witch/ have lopped off/ my braid/ which/ you daily/ climbed/ to me/ Forgive me/ you're not worth/ the pain/ in my scalp." Subversively hilarious. Kids will love sharing this with friends, laughing together. <i>(ages 8-12)&nbsp;</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2rJvz5o" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1531" data-original-width="1001" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-I2AG_Jy4IGM/XBiXfzPnlOI/AAAAAAAASyA/RDUAUdECjzM5pAC-E7V_qGtYy3SPfHumgCLcBGAs/s200/funny%2Bgirl.jpg" width="130" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2rJvz5o" target="_blank">Funny Girl</a></b>, edited by Betsy Bird: As television comedy writers Delaney and Mackenzie Yeager explain in their opening entry, "Joke-telling is the greatest superpower a gall can posses." Being a comedian takes confidence--a combination of audacity and courage to put yourself out there. This collection of short personal essays, short stories and comics is terrific. In "One Hot Mess," Carmen Agra Deedy shares about the time her mother set a bathtub on fire to get rid of the germs, unwittingly melting the fiberglass tub in their new apartment. With this great range of stories, you're bound to find new authors you'd like to explore.&nbsp;<i>(ages 9-13)&nbsp;</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2EB9HSn" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="883" height="162" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-kY55GWjmAL4/XBiX0JT8exI/AAAAAAAASyI/NtXSOgiCLL0GHM6_NumNCL2S-Muv5oP7gCLcBGAs/s200/interrupting%2Bchicken.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2EB9HSn" target="_blank">Interrupting Chicken</a></b>, by David Ezra Stein: One of my all-time favorite read alouds, a little red chicken keeps interrupting his papa's stories at bedtime, trying to save the day. When Papa starts reading Hansel and Gretel, little red chicken interrupts just as they are about to enter the witch’s house. Papa tries again with Little Red Riding Hood with exactly the same result. The interruptions bring laughter, and children love the repetition. Stein excels in comedic timing. A true crowd-pleaser. (ages 4-8)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2BqeUIM" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="541" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4g0AKY2gZ2I/XBiYLeoEwCI/AAAAAAAASyQ/dVBg2EoSMEwxpyKKEhbAjuYIhArVomiggCLcBGAs/s200/judy%2Bmoody%2B1.jpg" width="150" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2BqeUIM" target="_blank">Judy Moody</a></b>, by Megan McDonald: Judy Moody is a favorite series because kids can relate to her struggles and her moods. Whether it's having a toad pee in her hand or losing her lucky penny,&nbsp; Judy is always getting in a bad mood, at least for a while. Even better, each story ends with a satisfying climax. Judy realizes the power of friendships and keeps herself from throwing a tantrum. She rescues her homework, quite resourcefully, and even forgives her brother.&nbsp;<i>(ages 7-10)</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2BtjyFG" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="472" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wHdWi9j8c80/XBiYhkcZYTI/AAAAAAAASyY/qgjXALHml7A1FIJ-8sttCeLn8YzufskVgCLcBGAs/s200/tale%2Bdark%2Bgrimm.jpg" width="130" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2BtjyFG" target="_blank">A Tale Dark and Grimm</a></b>, by Adam Gidwitz: With dark humor, Gidwitz weaves together different Grimms' tales to create an original story starring Hansel and Gretel. I especially love the author's interruptions, where he pauses to talk directly to the reader. “This is when things start to get, well . . . awesome. But in a horrible, bloody kind of way." A terrific read aloud that will have readers alternating between laughter and suspense. <i>(ages 9-13)</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2Brv5Fr" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="803" data-original-width="600" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-AAGKhdF3lJ8/XBiY4z_9LaI/AAAAAAAASyk/ovQrFOt1yvQmb-NrElEwULXBYgVU553IgCLcBGAs/s200/terrible%2Btwo.jpg" width="149" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Brv5Fr" target="_blank">The Terrible Two</a></b>, by Mac Barnett and Jory John: Miles Murphy is known as the best prankster in his school, but now his family is moving and he dreads building his reputation in a new town. When he gets to school on the first day and sees the principal's car has been parked at top of the steps, blocking the school doors, Miles knows that there's already a prankster at this school. Can Miles out-prank this whoever is doing this...or maybe they can join forces. Written by a comedic duo, this series excels in deadpan humor in a school setting. <i>(ages 8-12)</i><br /><br />If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=ENRaDy9AHbs:y4gWa2uSEqk:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=ENRaDy9AHbs:y4gWa2uSEqk:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=ENRaDy9AHbs:y4gWa2uSEqk:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/ENRaDy9AHbs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-funny-books-to-get-you-laughing.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-9959805487553723022018-12-16T20:30:00.002-08:002018-12-16T20:30:26.778-08:00Ten favorite picture books (ages 3-10)Picture books are truly for everybody. Read them together with young children, sharing a story together, savoring the joy of discovery. Encourage older children to take a break with picture books and savor the story. Here's a selection of old and new picture books I love.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2CiImlt" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="962" data-original-width="1000" height="191" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-L1Zl1LVcNI8/XBcixzL1EHI/AAAAAAAASv8/2KBiJcNFT_4RC03YQ8WlvdtocIxVqP6ewCLcBGAs/s200/alma.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2CiImlt" target="_blank">Alma and How She Got Her Name</a></b>, by Juana Martinez-Neal: Oh how I love this book. As one young reader told me, “it makes me want to learn more about my own name.” Alma helps us all feel like we are special for being unique. Alma Sofia Esperanza Josi Pura Candela worries about her long name until her father tells her family stories, one for each person she's named after. The illustrations are soft and gently sweet, showing the distinctive essence of each ancestor and the affections between Alma and her family. (<i>ages 4-8</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2LlcWhc" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="750" data-original-width="580" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-m6g6bWxvRqI/XBcjAnPZXdI/AAAAAAAASwA/F2FysTzsVJszmQM6uOp5NkdnilHJw_J7gCLcBGAs/s200/drawn%2Btogether.jpg" width="154" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2LlcWhc" target="_blank">Drawn Together</a></b>, by Minh Lê, illustrated by Dan Santat: When a young boy visits his grandfather, they struggle to communicate because the grandson only speaks English and his grandfather only speaks Thai. After an uncomfortable dinner where the cultural divides are palpably painful, the boy pulls out a sketch he's made of a superhero. He's surprised when his grandfather starts drawing a Thai warrior. As they start drawing together, they build a new world layered and complex with both cultures. Not only is this a beautiful story, it is full of universal emotions: connecting across generations and cultures, relating to each other through art and storytelling, and discovering shared passions. (<i>ages 4-9</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2BtH0CG" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="648" data-original-width="631" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WngwTSyePW4/XBcjPyNv5_I/AAAAAAAASwI/9DCA6VCXbq8NMIC0NPRXWVFufqglujo3gCLcBGAs/s200/duck%2Brabbit.jpg" width="194" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2BtH0CG" target="_blank">Duck! Rabbit!</a></b>, by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld: Is it a duck? Or a rabbit? What do you think? Turn it upside down - do you see anything different? The off-stage narrators argue back and forth, trying to convince each other that their perspective is right. Lichtenheld's illustrations, with absolute clearness and utter ambiguity, are perfect for encouraging your own kids to join the debate. (<i>ages 4-9</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2S5pQma" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="790" height="181" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nAiUFUpX8Ps/XBcjmOmRTcI/AAAAAAAASwU/h1DbbepJlIwvfduvHiSLjkzn1icbcFTqwCLcBGAs/s200/firebird.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2S5pQma" target="_blank">Firebird</a></b>, by Misty Copeland, illustrated by Christopher Myers: A young African American girl looks up to Copeland saying, "the space between you and me is longer than forever"--how could I ever become as beautiful and graceful as you? Copeland turns to the young girl, reassuring her that she was once just as small, just as shy--and the magic comes when you pursue your dreams. (<i>ages 6-10</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2ByRrVV" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="648" data-original-width="518" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-pGHqiVLBJWw/XBcj0do0FsI/AAAAAAAASwY/aft8XuCm6pYZ0ytO8qssqvElyQ0k9xIdQCLcBGAs/s200/harold%2Band%2Bthe%2Bpurple%2Bcrayon.jpg" width="159" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2ByRrVV" target="_blank">Harold and the Purple Crayon</a></b>, by Crockett Johnson: One night, Harold decided to go for a walk. Bringing only his giant purple crayon, Harold draws himself a world full of wonder and imagination, from a sailboat on a stormy sea to a picnic with a moose with nine kinds of pie! This classic picture book has inspired young children since 1955, but it captivates children still, showing them how far their imagination can take them. (<i>ages 3-7</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2Ll9EKV" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="713" data-original-width="1000" height="142" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-wBD75BIGBwU/XBcj_eOROWI/AAAAAAAASwc/1ShVNXg8laYhAgDK5YF7UNS3SUi46_3CgCLcBGAs/s200/hello%2Bhello%2Bwenzel.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Ll9EKV" target="_blank">Hello Hello</a></b>, by Brendan Wenzel: This picture book will delight young readers, saying hello to different animals. Read the spare rhymes slowly, encouraging readers to notice how the animals are similar and different. "Hello Stripes. Hello Spots." Sure, tigers have stripes and cheetahs have spots, but what about fish and lizards? Which they have stripes and spots, too! I especially love the way Wenzel gives clues on each page of what's coming next--the whale shark's spotted tail, leads into: "Hello Giant. Hello Not." Wenzel's animals are full of life, and a key in the back will help eager readers to learn all of their names. (<i>ages 3-8</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QE824L" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="929" data-original-width="1000" height="185" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CtD5GxpIH-M/XBckjPCtkLI/AAAAAAAASwo/63CPHWkT0zkHP-EwxYABMfEYrgYGwSAcQCLcBGAs/s200/julian%2Bis%2Ba%2Bmermaid.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QE824L" target="_blank">Julián Is a Mermaid</a></b>, by Jessica Love: After Julián, a young Afro-Latinx child, sees three fabulous people dressed as mermaids, he creates his own costume. When Abuela discovers this, will she support him or chastise him? In this delightful story, Julian's grandmother embraces his creativity, helping him complete the outfit, and then proudly taking him to a parade. This story delights readers and never becomes too preachy, staying rooted in the joy of imagination and the importance of being seen and recognized. (<i>ages 4-8</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2R0iBP8" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1009" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-WmwPk7yGjRA/XBckxvOzT8I/AAAAAAAASws/KAoZ7bqmn7oq4c9gWzQ3Sno8zNTSpowZwCLcBGAs/s200/nino%2Bwrestles%2Bthe%2Bworld.jpg" width="198" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2R0iBP8" target="_blank">Niño Wrestles the World</a></b>, by Yuyi Morales: With a huge imagination and a love of luche libre, the popular Mexican wrestling sport, little Niño battles his own make-believe monsters. Whether he’s defeating the Guanajuato mummy or exploding the giant Olmec Head, this is one confident little kid. Morales brings humor, dynamic energy and vivid artwork to this terrific picture book. (ages 4-8)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2S3Bhup" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1209" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-gh88_63qkVw/XBclBhLXILI/AAAAAAAASw4/8Z2CGN4QNqYI48B3AqGykUcBl0SFNC_ywCLcBGAs/s200/press%2Bhere.jpg" width="165" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2S3Bhup" target="_blank">Press Here</a></b>, Hervé Tullet: This ingenious interactive book invites readers right into the action of this story, pressing dots to multiply them, blowing on them to scatter them across the page, clapping to make them blow up like a balloon. It is utterly simple and yet completely engrossing, showing readers that they are truly part of making any story come alive and leap off the pages of a book. (ages 3-7)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2UMZyXu" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1250" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-DFZJx2zxYHg/XBclcZ93RQI/AAAAAAAASxA/8y7qvsD8xfcjSf36G5Lj0wYAyvIxhPUSwCLcBGAs/s200/rain%2Bashman.jpg" width="160" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2UMZyXu" target="_blank">Rain</a></b>, by Linda Ashman, illustrated by Christian Robinson: Have you ever noticed that a good mood can be contagious? One a rain day, a grumpy old man complains about his "nasty galoshes" and the "dang puddle." But not everyone feels that way. A little boy is so excited to put on his froggy hat and rain boots. When they bump into each other, the little guy's mood eventually rubs off on the old man. A delightful story, perfect for spreading a smile. (ages 4-8)<br /><br />If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=WDr4qk7Rn-8:EJcHHrORDw4:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=WDr4qk7Rn-8:EJcHHrORDw4:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=WDr4qk7Rn-8:EJcHHrORDw4:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/WDr4qk7Rn-8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-favorite-picture-books-ages-3-10.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-57125378568718958732018-12-14T15:00:00.000-08:002018-12-14T15:00:06.284-08:00Ten terrific chapter books for growing readers (ages 6-9)Chapter books play an important role in children’s reading -- helping them transition from decoding individual words to reading for the joy of a story that builds in their minds over several days. Enjoy and share!<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QVfJmo" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1455" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-pjy8_7GeaXg/XBMzQV8r7YI/AAAAAAAASvA/SdtRLIOFSAQwJ8gBdXjgbYa_Pwv4SyiGQCLcBGAs/s200/bad%2Bkitty%2Bbath.jpg" width="136" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QVfJmo" target="_blank">Bad Kitty</a></b>, by Nick Bruel: This hilarious series will hook kids with its goofy humor and exaggerated illustrations. Bruel balances simple sentences with fast-paced stories in this series that make new readers laugh and beg for more. In&nbsp;<a href="https://amzn.to/2QMRFST" target="_blank">Bad Kitty Gets a Bath</a>,&nbsp;one of my family's favorites, Bruel explains exactly what you’ll need to do to get your favorite feline into the bath. (<i>ages 6-10</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2UIykBq" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="947" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-kD1ULV3zgjg/XBMzg9BKOuI/AAAAAAAASvI/zuuM6j9pX68-7diqlnRyloR5HLDb6DbLQCLcBGAs/s200/bad%2Bguys.jpg" width="157" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2UIykBq" target="_blank">The Bad Guys</a></b>, by Aaron Blabey: Mr Wolf decides that he's fed up with always being the "bad guy," so he persuades his friends that they need to do nice things for a change. The want-to-be good guys try hard to shed their carnivorous ways, but when they rescue a stranded kitty she's terrified of their pointy teeth. Each mission brings hilarious antics--and a terrific underlying message challenging prejudice and refusing to let setbacks get you down. (<i>ages 6-10</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2PAZvKI" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="826" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bSq8UlSydW8/XBMw_VpjSBI/AAAAAAAASt0/v5lnkVVm2kwpAnMq2wc2GyGbfZDwIfjFACLcBGAs/s200/boris%2Bfor%2Bthe%2Bwin.jpg" width="137" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2PAZvKI" target="_blank">Boris for the Win</a></b>, by Andrew Joyner: Boris dreams of winning the big race at school. He practices and works hard, but when it comes down to the big day, he's faced with a dilemma: will he go for the gold, or help a friend in need? Kids will relate to Boris, the goofy little warthog who’s the star of this very easy beginning chapter book. (<i>ages 5-8</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QxdmH0" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1000" data-original-width="752" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-mzZmvkinbds/XBMxGrrjd2I/AAAAAAAASt4/C152spuW-XsM25-wNpTAGIorxnbhybQ4ACLcBGAs/s200/critter%2Bclub.jpg" width="150" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QxdmH0" target="_blank">Critter Club</a></b>, by Callie Barkley: In the series opener,&nbsp;Amy she spends her spring vacation helping at her mom’s veterinary clinic. When a local puppy goes missing, Amy tracks down the clues and saves the day. With the reward money, Amy and her friends start a local animal shelter. This series brings lots of smiles with four likable, diverse characters and plenty of cute animals. (<i>ages 5-8</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2EvaKmW" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="823" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-SPps5nyA9yQ/XBMxN33lePI/AAAAAAAASt8/6pi7bt8HGlE_CzrqpIYihRfwjRc-p1RpwCLcBGAs/s200/emma%2Bis%2Bon%2Bthe%2Bair.jpg" width="136" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2EvaKmW" target="_blank">Emma Is on the Air</a></b>&nbsp;by Ida Siegal: Emma Perez dreams big and bold. She wants to be FAMOUS! When she sees an investigative reporter on the TV news, she knows that this is just the career for her. When Javier, finds a worm in his lunch at school the next day, it’s the perfect story for Emma to investigate. Emma is a likable character with an upbeat attitude. (<i>ages 6-10</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QWwqy8" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="648" data-original-width="504" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-BdyZWeiXb5Y/XBMy0kQEgII/AAAAAAAASus/86N2_pyppZkJxETy_o3cVfM_Qp871Av1gCLcBGAs/s200/ivy%2B%2526%2Bbean.jpg" width="155" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QWwqy8" target="_blank">Ivy &amp; Bean</a>,</b>&nbsp;by Annie Barrows: Ivy and Bean is my absolute favorite series for 1st - 3rd graders. I love these two friends who are so goofy and full of mischief. Bean is sure that she will never be friends with Ivy, especially when her mother insists that Ivy is such a nice girl. “Nice, Bean knew, is another word for boring.” But when she finds out that Ivy is in training to become a witch and might have the perfect spell to cast on Bean’s bossy older sister, this unlikely duo become inseparable. (<i>ages 6-10</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><a href="https://amzn.to/2Lee326" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="1247" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-kacDo3VK6uc/XBM9t7JaOxI/AAAAAAAASvU/V5X4O1_8lX8Rix1xt8tPFN4bP5V-GMlkACLcBGAs/s200/mercy%2Bwatson.jpg" width="155" /></a><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Lee326" target="_blank">Mercy Watson</a></b>, by Kate DiCamillo: Mercy Watson is not just a lovable pig, she’s the darling of Mr. and Mrs. Watson. They are sure she’ll get them out of trouble, but readers know that Mercy is really only thinking about hot buttered toast. Kids laugh at each one of the Mercy Watson books, full of crazy antics and lots of hot buttered toast. (<i>ages 5-8</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2LkV71W" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="826" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-NMVfloE57GQ/XBMx806tLnI/AAAAAAAASuY/U-lf8G19NRkAiUprfpVZ_LK2B8VaBLrXgCLcBGAs/s200/notebooks%2Bof%2Bdoom.jpg" width="137" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2LkV71W" target="_blank">The Notebook of Doom</a></b>, by Troy Cummings: A 2nd grade student wrote to me, "This book was terrific!!!! It was really funny. The main character is Alexander. His dad thought the balloon goons were just balloons but they were evil and sucked all of the air. I think people that like funny books would like this book." Definite kid approval. (<i>ages 6-10</i>)<br /><br /><div class="" style="clear: both; text-align: left;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2LeRbzC" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="564" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-uhCKOjQPgSM/XBMyXwj2pnI/AAAAAAAASug/doSvOYXUt58u2OV2jEjSPQVKxqIV-NsFwCLcBGAs/s200/princess%2Bblack.jpg" width="156" /></a><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2LeRbzC" target="_blank">Princess in Black</a></b>, by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale: Who says princesses can’t wear black and fight the bad guys?! Princess Marigold is prim and proper as she has tea with Duchess Wigtower. As soon as the monster alarm sounds, the princess makes a quick costume change and heads out to save the day using special moves like the "Sparkle Slam" and the "Twinkle Twinkle Little Smash." Terrific fun! (<i>ages 5-8</i>)</div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2LewSlP" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1389" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-uOTvFewSZE4/XBMyk4gUnCI/AAAAAAAASuk/gDDoRzMi_-00azw_bF55nKV-Uxxa46iRQCLcBGAs/s200/sofia%2Bmartinez.jpg" width="143" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2LewSlP" target="_blank">Sofia Martinez</a></b>, by Jacqueline Jules: Sofia does all sorts of things to get noticed--from wearing a huge hair bow to making her grandmother a piñata for her birthday. It isn’t easy being one of three sisters, especially when your mother can’t tell your pictures apart! Sofia’s happy, loving Latino family brings smiles, and many readers will relate to her stories. (<i>ages 5-8</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2PCDAme" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="450" data-original-width="298" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Vwfb-VrvaXs/XBNB-hT-xHI/AAAAAAAASvg/dp9nl1e9aqYCaqOAsf-P8o0FFWjwXTogACLcBGAs/s200/Unicorn%2BRescue%2BSociety%2B1.jpeg" width="131" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2PCDAme" target="_blank">Unicorn Rescue Society</a></b>, by Adam Gidwitz: On his first day at a new school, Elliot and his new friend Uchenna discover a mythical creature that looks like a tiny blue dragon. When Professor Fauna, their eccentric science teacher, realizes this is the mythical Jersey Devil, he invites them to join the Unicorn Rescue Society. As the series unfolds, Elliot and Uchenna will rescue mythical animals from different cultures and places, bringing young readers traveling the globe with them. Emerson students are loving this new series, perfect for readers who are moving beyond Magic Treehouse but still want a story that moves quickly. <i>(ages 7-10)</i><br /><br />If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=V_KG9LhW0ro:DzdDx9yBafE:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=V_KG9LhW0ro:DzdDx9yBafE:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=V_KG9LhW0ro:DzdDx9yBafE:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/V_KG9LhW0ro" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-terrific-chapter-books.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-23182926803751891912018-12-13T18:00:00.000-08:002018-12-13T18:00:02.200-08:00Ten outstanding audiobooks (ages 4-18)Is your family taking a long drive this winter? Consider listening to an audiobook together, letting it take you on an adventure, laugh together or learn about something new. You'll notice that I'm including three memoirs here -- I especially find listening to some tell their story on audio particularly inspiring.<br /><br />Try downloading e-audiobooks through your public library for free; check if your library uses <b>OverDrive</b>, <b>Axis 360</b> or <b>Hoopla Digital</b>.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2LkYsy5" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="353" data-original-width="353" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-RdEtqofEUu4/XBH9rk_1k9I/AAAAAAAASrs/_71IXKQPUekJTUfYvmTU9MHF0tWT_VVPgCLcBGAs/s200/born%2Ba%2Bcrime.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2LkYsy5" target="_blank">Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood</a></b>, by Trevor Noah: Comedian Trevor Noah narrates his memoir, sharing his harsh experiences growing up in South Africa in the final years of apartheid and the chaotic aftermath as the son of a white Dutch father and a black Xhosa mother. Listeners get to hear Noah tell these stories in his South African accented English and several other South African languages. He is engaging, funny and relatable, while also delivering thoughtful and perceptive social criticism about race, gender and class. (<i>ages 13 and up</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2PwT9fn" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="342" data-original-width="342" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ekXCB4aab_s/XBH9weZk4yI/AAAAAAAASrw/ojgR84PiccIvYGecygO6zFpGCipWYkR_gCLcBGAs/s200/dominic.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2PwT9fn" target="_blank">Dominic</a></b>, by William Steig, narrated by Peter Thomas: As Dominic leaves home in search of adventure, young listeners will be captivated by this delightful hero’s journey. Dominic bumbles his way through his journey with curiosity, goodwill and a solid sense of right and wrong as he makes friends, helps others in need and battles the Doomsday Gang. (<i>ages 6-9</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2rwTNzP" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="342" data-original-width="342" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-dpkPA4zvUsU/XBH_5fx2ToI/AAAAAAAASs8/cUaribW8RUYnMnzs8eE04GwSx83_FdhNQCLcBGAs/s200/dory%2Baudiobook.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2rwTNzP" target="_blank">Dory Fantasmagory</a></b>, by Abby Hanlon, narrated by Suzy Jackson: Dory (called Rascal by her family) wants to play with her big brother and sister, but they complain that she's a pest. Narrator Suzy Jackson captures Dory's 6-year-old voice, with a full range of enthusiasm and emotions. Families will recognize themselves in Dory's attention-getting strategies, her mom's exasperation or her siblings' bickering. A joyful, funny celebration of imagination and resilience. (<i>ages 4-9</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2C9KpYS" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="537" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-jfIxBf3M_7w/XBKsr7SFVkI/AAAAAAAAStU/7TCzVsOBqmErFy4HIzkvhzq0E1NQ3gBuQCLcBGAs/s200/track%2Bseries.jpg" width="66" /></a></div><div style="text-align: left;"><b style="font-weight: bold;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2C9KpYS" target="_blank">Track</a> series</b>: <b><a href="https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Ghost/Jason-Reynolds/Track/9781508230472" target="_blank">Ghost</a></b>, <a href="https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Patina/Jason-Reynolds/Track/9781508236498" target="_blank"><b>Patina</b></a>, <b><a href="https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Sunny/Jason-Reynolds/Track/9781508246145" target="_blank">Sunny</a></b> &amp; <b><a href="https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Lu/Jason-Reynolds/Track/9781508246176" target="_blank">Lu</a></b>, by Jason Reynolds, narrated by Guy Lockhart, Heather Alicia Simms: <b>Ghost</b> is an all-time favorite, and I've loved the audiobooks for the rest of this series. Guy Lockhart captures the emotions and voice of each different character, with energy and enthusiasm. I especially appreciate how he balances the humor with the darker moments in each book. I've just started listening to <b>Lu</b>, and his swagger and confidence is perfect. Heather Simms captures Patina's many different moods, moving from sassy to tender with ease. All together, these are outstanding audiobooks--"for real for real", as Lu says. (<i>ages 9-14</i>)</div><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2UFScFg" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1159" data-original-width="1001" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZlIRhM0kdZE/XBH-VqFwqYI/AAAAAAAASsI/VIcU8j3IiKofMtkH505yx2sUskCuauVlQCLcBGAs/s200/i%2Bhave%2Bthe%2Bright%2Bto%2Baudio.jpg" width="172" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2UFScFg" target="_blank">I Have the Right To: A High School Survivor's Story of Sexual Assault, Justice, and Hope</a></b>, by Chessy Prout: As a freshman at St. Paul’s School in New Hampshire, Chessy Prout was sexually assaulted by an upperclassman. In her raw and honest memoir, Prout shares her experience of assault and the subsequent journey with the tumultuous trial, media attention and search for healing and change. As I read this, I was particularly angered by the way the school resisted Chessy's search for justice and struck by how the legal system does not help our young people find the resolution they need. A powerful memoir. (ages 13-18)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><a href="https://amzn.to/2PC72IW" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="342" data-original-width="342" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-H9pYWjp2Up4/XBKvfZ5OvKI/AAAAAAAAStg/5dGnEEWMrYMS4i29zeZD_gQ3k6Ae2CCpACLcBGAs/s200/like%2Bvanessa.jpg" width="200" /></a><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2PC72IW" target="_blank">Like Vanessa</a></b>, by Tami Charles, narrated by Channie Waites: Eighth grader Vanessa Martin dreams of winning her school’s beauty contest, despite feeling too fat, too dark and too shy. Her spirits soar with Vanessa Williams’ historic win as the first black Miss America. But the journey is hard -- will her talented singing shine? Or will her doubts weigh her down? Channie Waites’ narration brings Vanessa’s worries, laughter and grace to life, and her voice sparkles with magnetic charm. (<i>ages 10-14</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><a href="https://amzn.to/2UK55hp" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="648" data-original-width="648" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-aVoAxg_6wpM/XBKvzV-qdDI/AAAAAAAASto/EI4GF6jRXQY9DFHEOdrAWxYx8v7kUBf_ACLcBGAs/s200/poet%2Bx.jpg" width="200" /></a><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2UK55hp" target="_blank">The Poet X</a></b>, by Elizabeth Acevedo: Elizabeth Acevedo shines narrating her debut novel, using her talents as an award-winning slam poet to bring passion and life to Xiomara’s story. A first-generation Dominican-American, Xiomara struggles balancing her mother’s strict Catholicism with her own desire to find her place in the world. Writing poetry helps Xio come into her own, channelling her feelings, worries and questions. Acevedo’s poetry is beautifully crafted and the audiobook brings the passion and pacing of the rhythmic free-verse poems to life. (<i>ages 14-18</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2C9VXeK" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1511" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hOJmbSdYeIA/XBH-mfEbYmI/AAAAAAAASsY/asr_kPHBA3AT5SPTRocpI59pYjfXgjBrgCLcBGAs/s200/proud.jpeg" width="131" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2C9VXeK" target="_blank">Proud: Living My American Dream</a></b>, by Ibtihaj Muhammad: U.S. Olympic fencing medalist, Ibtihaj Muhammad shares her inspiring memoir, showing how faith, hard work and determination helped her reach her goals. She frankly talks about the many obstacles she faced, yet she comes across as both humble and realistic. She conveys the excitement of winning, and the frustrations and self-doubt she faced. Even though I know nothing about fencing, I couldn't put this down. Ibtihaj is a true American hero. (<i>ages 10-16</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2PzOFo5" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1156" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-bPCazmEnJPU/XBH-px3enrI/AAAAAAAASsg/IsgNkzj9c5wQeJ0AIpkNNUCUVVELJ57GQCLcBGAs/s200/refugee%2Baudiobook.jpg" width="172" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2PzOFo5" target="_blank">Refugee</a></b>, by Alan Gratz: Gratz alternates the stories of three children from different periods of time, each of whom are fleeing their homes in search of refuge. Josef is escaping persecution from Nazis in Germany during World War II. Isabel and her family are fleeing Cuba in 1994, escaping the riots and unrest under Castro's rule. And Mahmoud's family flees Syria in 2015 after their home was bombed. These parallel stories are engrossing and compelling. The structure keeps the suspense high, and helps readers see how each character must cope with extreme stress, separation and loss. Gratz uses historical fiction at its best to help readers understand global issues in a way that inspires hope and empathy. (<i>ages 10-16</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2UIJp5f" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="622" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-zNa2HrCTbfQ/XBH-tihrwvI/AAAAAAAASso/ChekXefLnvkhI45VCokps_TGZ8b_XcXLgCLcBGAs/s200/war%2Bthat%2Bsaved%2Bmy%2Blife%2Baudiobook.jpg" width="172" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2UIJp5f" target="_blank">The War That Saved My Life</a></b>, by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, narrated by Jayne Entwistle: My students have particularly loved this audiobook and its sequel, <b>The War I Finally Won</b>, finding the story of Ada inspiring as she realizes how she's able to overcome many odds stacked against her. As the story opens, ten-year-old Ada has a clubfoot and is kept locked in her family's one bedroom apartment in London, during World War II. Ada practices making herself walk, so she and her younger brother, can escape and join a train of children being evacuated to the countryside. Jayne Entwistle's narration brings Ada's complexities to life, with her layers of distrust and strength, courage and doubt. (<i>ages 9-12</i>)<div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=dDZh25Mnd9E:--MyIg_rc-0:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=dDZh25Mnd9E:--MyIg_rc-0:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=dDZh25Mnd9E:--MyIg_rc-0:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/dDZh25Mnd9E" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com2http://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-outstanding-audiobooks.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-86095506281749290332018-12-12T21:55:00.002-08:002018-12-12T21:55:56.152-08:00Ten top books for speaking your truth (ages 7-18)As I continue to celebrate 10 years of blogging, I want to turn to books that encourage us to speak our truths. While books can't change the world, they can help give us the courage to stay true to our beliefs, to do the right thing in difficult situations. These stories focus on young people courageously speaking up for themselves in the face of difficulties.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2Py0b3m" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1581" data-original-width="1001" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-X3BufGfRZ0E/XBHvwGe844I/AAAAAAAASqU/dkloBdmww7gPBcU_z37xtE5cyotk_cbGACLcBGAs/s200/anger%2Bis%2Ba%2Bgift.jpg" width="126" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Py0b3m" target="_blank">Anger Is a Gift</a></b>, by Mark Oshiro: Black teen Moss struggles with panic attacks and anxiety, a result of his father's death from police brutality six years earlier in Oakland, CA. When school administrators bring armed police in for random locker searches and install metal detectors, Moss and his friends organize a protest. I especially appreciated how Oshiro balances Moss's personal journey and the way his community comes together to protest the authoritarian administration. A powerful book, with an authentic local setting, for fans of <b>The Hate U Give</b>. (<i>ages 14-18</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QQ564r" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="600" data-original-width="400" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-5uFkhi_yJpQ/XBHwIED7D4I/AAAAAAAASqc/_z9liTO3T-AY6MglAyeha6tnylcBhwEvgCLcBGAs/s200/front%2Bdesk.jpg" width="133" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QQ564r" target="_blank">Front Desk</a></b>, by Kelly Yang: Mia's family has recently immigrated from China, and finding a steady job has been really tough for her parents. When an opportunity to manage a motel comes their way, they leap at it. Mia's excited that she can help out, managing the front desk while her parents clean the rooms. Kelly Yang bases this story on her own experience, immigrating from China to Los Angeles. She weaves humor and compassion into her story, speaking from her personal experience to frankly address poverty, bullying and the importance of family. (<i>ages 8-12</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2EjfcnF" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="750" data-original-width="516" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-7W2oeywevdY/XBHwZoqajcI/AAAAAAAASqk/8k8Ei0cKgbIMeppFzV64y52TV01linwPwCLcBGAs/s200/ghost%2Bboys.jpeg" width="137" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2EjfcnF" target="_blank">Ghost Boys</a></b>, by Jewell Parker Rhodes: After being killed by a white police officer, a 12 year old black boy returns as a ghost to process what has happened and how it is affecting his family. The ghost of Emmett Till, a black boy murdered in 1955, and other "ghost boys" who have been murdered, help Jerome understand the larger historical context. The chapters jump back and forth in time, weaving together the social and political framework to help young readers grapple with the impact of police violence on communities of color. (<i>ages 10-15</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2C8yomP" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1525" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8_eWHttnXNo/XBHwshLDu7I/AAAAAAAASqs/4KGHqy4TdwYm9oB1zuU-ht6KyrIhpDVEgCLcBGAs/s200/i%2Bhave%2Bthe%2Bright%2Bto.jpg" width="130" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2C8yomP" target="_blank">I Have the Right To: A High School Survivor's Story of Sexual Assault, Justice, and Hope</a></b>, by Chessy Prout: As a freshman at St. Paul’s School in New Hampshire, Chessy Prout was sexually assaulted by an upperclassman. In her raw and honest memoir, Prout shares her experience of assault and the subsequent journey with the tumultuous trial, media attention and search for healing and change. As I read this, I was particularly angered by the way the school resisted Chessy's search for justice and struck by how the legal system does not help our young people find the resolution they need. A powerful memoir. (<i>ages 13-18</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QR0Hy5" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1000" data-original-width="775" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ERMQzkvfmcg/XBHw_kXp8sI/AAAAAAAASq0/XK53vJTsfOwnkAYoiKHajc6S7CTFnc6qwCLcBGAs/s200/%2523Notyourprincess.jpg" width="155" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QR0Hy5" target="_blank">#Notyourprincess: Voices of Native American Women</a></b>, by Lisa Charleyboy: This anthology shares the voices, art, poetry, and insight of modern Native women about their life experiences--the good and the bad, the joyous and the painful--creating a powerful message of the importance of speaking the truth and being visible in a culture that it so often dismissive or manipulative. I especially appreciate the wide diversity of Native women that is represented here. Brilliant and moving collection. (<i>ages 12-18</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QNErVL" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1416" data-original-width="1001" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-hAVTK6WnXgY/XBHxOiRtrsI/AAAAAAAASq4/0wt02cnEQNwJE2NAL994iH-JPSerbaQSwCLcBGAs/s200/The%2BPrince%2Band%2Bthe%2BDressmaker.jpg" width="140" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QNErVL" target="_blank">The Prince and the Dressmaker</a></b>, by Jen Wang: Prince Sebastian feels comfortable identifying both male and female, often wearing dresses and going out as his alter ego, Lady Crystallia. When he hires Frances, a young seamstress, to make him a wardrobe of boldly beautiful, dazzling dresses, Frances hesitates at first, but they soon discover a shared passion for fashion. Incorporating the feel of classic fairytales, Wang creates a story that revolves around friendship, following your dreams and speaking your truth. (<i>ages 10-15</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2PErE3C" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1000" data-original-width="662" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-IZtevWxAkOI/XBHxc_6IDSI/AAAAAAAASrA/kKBcbLylS4EnEdzTElgAwUCGwNSsrW9NACLcBGAs/s200/The%2BPoet%2BX.jpeg" width="131" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2PErE3C" target="_blank">The Poet X</a></b>, by Elizabeth Acevedo: A first-generation Dominican-American, fifteen-year-old Xiomara struggles balancing her mother’s strict Catholicism with her own desire to find her place in the world. Writing poetry helps Xio come into her own, channelling her feelings, worries and questions in her journal, as she explores her blossoming romance with Aman, her science partner. As Xio starts figuring out how she can stand up for what she believes, she discovers the power of her voice through the poetry club at school. This powerful coming-of-age story poignantly speaks to teens finding their voice. (<i>ages 13-18</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2EhW3T8" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1512" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WQfup0_k7Kk/XBHxsl_KckI/AAAAAAAASrM/MREqU7NtDJ4qjYDjFNY8eVQbACUmATy0gCLcBGAs/s200/Stella%2BDiaz%2BHas%2BSomething%2Bto%2BSay.jpg" width="131" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2EhW3T8" target="_blank">Stella Diaz Has Something to Say</a></b>, by Angela Dominguez: Stella is shy, self-conscious about her accent and the way she jumbles Spanish and English when she can't find the right word. As third grade starts, she's also worried about being in a different class from her best friend Jenny. I&nbsp; especially appreciate how Stella's Mexican-American family supports her and cheers her on as she discovers her courage and voice. (<i>ages 7-10</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2Pzxrr1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1500" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-JQcePkGpdIc/XBHyBVtT45I/AAAAAAAASrU/4VI6uDnVZMcmEBbKCH_ysdIeuhWfmr9WQCLcBGAs/s200/Swing.jpeg" width="133" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Pzxrr1" target="_blank">Swing</a></b>, by Kwame Alexander: Noah, Walt and Sam (Samantha) have been best friends since elementary school, but ever since they got to high school, Noah hasn't been able to figure out how to tell Sam that he really likes her. No matter how much Walt (aka Swing) encourages him to take a chance, Noah struggles to express his feelings for Sam. Inspired by love letters he finds in a thrift store, Noah finally starts to put his feelings onto paper using both art and poetry. While I related to Noah, I was utterly charmed by Swing's humor and optimism. Readers will want to talk when they reach the end--be there for them, as they find their voice about the larger issues impacting our society. (<i>ages 13-18</i>)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QONdmu" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1200" data-original-width="802" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VdglbmgaH7U/XBHyjDMhAdI/AAAAAAAASrg/VqdoiIe9j-cQn2wEdAas1Egx5Sv-Ge65ACLcBGAs/s200/The%2BWitch%2BBoy.jpg" width="133" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QONdmu" target="_blank">The Witch Boy</a></b>, by Molly Ostertag: This graphic novel will appeal to readers with its magical setting and strong protagonist. In Aster's village, there are very clear expectations: girls will learn witchcraft and spells, while boys will learn to become shapeshifters. Yet Aster yearns to learn the spells that his sister is perfecting, and is not interested in the other boy's aggressive play. When several boys go missing, Aster tries to use his developing magical abilities to solve the mystery. I especially appreciated the way Aster questions society's gender expectations and stays true to himself. A delightful graphic novel -- I'm looking forward to reading the sequel, <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2PwQiDb" target="_blank">The Hidden Witch</a></b>, which has just come out. (<i>ages 8-12</i>)<br /><br />If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=n7FOmuQlBkM:ighRoDxP4uc:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=n7FOmuQlBkM:ighRoDxP4uc:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=n7FOmuQlBkM:ighRoDxP4uc:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/n7FOmuQlBkM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com1http://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-top-books-for-speaking-your-truth.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-18561531172970726762018-12-11T18:00:00.000-08:002018-12-11T18:00:09.701-08:00Ten winning sports books for kids (ages 5-14)Whether you play sports with your kids or love watching games together, you’ll have fun sharing these books. You'll find a balance of nonfiction and fiction and a wide range of sports. One thing I'm noticing is that I haven't read as many novels with girls playing sports -- clearly, that's a goal for 2019!<br /><br /><b>Nonfiction</b><br /><br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2PwonD4" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="154" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-cP-LL-QWxo4/XA9BfdYmwHI/AAAAAAAASoo/P0N6m6L7V54hma9kzuwPdsWgeclz2v-uQCK4BGAYYCw/s200/baseball%2Bthen%2Bto%2Bwow.jpg" width="200" /></a><b></b><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2PwonD4" target="_blank">Baseball: Then to Wow!</a></b> by the editors of Sports Illustrated Kids: Whether it’s looking at changes in equipment or comparing playing styles then and now, this high-interest book provides opportunities for fans to analyze different aspects of the game. Great layout, photographs and illustrations engage kids and help them see the progression of the game over the past 150 years. <i>(ages 7-12)</i><br /><br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2L9FpGG" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-vX55g8qfHIk/XA9B5ubtRzI/AAAAAAAASo0/8v1DahB9f2g97GySplOBBejC2HIKhqkLQCK4BGAYYCw/s200/between%2Bthe%2Blines.jpg" width="150" /></a><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2L9FpGG" target="_blank">Between the Lines: How Ernie Barnes Went from the Football Field to the Art Gallery</a></b>, by Sandra Neil Wallace, illustrated by Bryan Collier: Although his athletic skills brought Ernie Barnes success as a professional football player, his true passion was art. He would quickly sketch scenes as he sat on the bench between plays. Barnes pursued his dreams, eventually becoming the official artist for the American Football League.&nbsp;<i>(ages 6-10)</i><br /><br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2UyrZZ9" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ZNTUcsxBW2Q/XA9CRBsMicI/AAAAAAAASpA/0ASvA4zeTl4WkqqdwlXmG085FbWq1qxjQCK4BGAYYCw/s200/girl%2Brunning.jpg" width="167" /></a><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2UyrZZ9" target="_blank">Girl Running: Bobbi Gibb and the Boston Marathon</a></b>, by Annette Bay Pimentel, illustrated by Micha Archer: In 1966, Bobbi Gibb became the first woman to run the Boston Marathon, even though the authorities would not recognize her efforts. Despite the authorities’ rejection, she decides to run alongside the registered racers, determined to prove that the rules were wrong. An inspiring picture book biography of defying the odds.&nbsp;<i>(ages 5-9)</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2EqpTpv" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1511" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-huo72WtztoM/XA9FGnsMn0I/AAAAAAAASpI/oEgs7UpBrvsdJLQ97oqH-1mTVFzO-0LfQCLcBGAs/s200/proud.jpeg" width="131" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2EqpTpv" target="_blank">Proud: Living My American Dream</a></b>, by Ibtihaj Muhammad: U.S. Olympic fencing medalist, Ibtihaj Muhammad shares her inspiring memoir, showing how faith, hard work and determination helped her reach her goals. She frankly talks about the many obstacles she faced, yet she comes across as both humble and realistic. She conveys the excitement of winning, and the frustrations and self-doubt she faced. Even though I know nothing about fencing, I couldn't put this down. Ibtihaj is a true American hero.&nbsp;<i>(ages 10-16)</i><br /><div><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2rvyDSH" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="476" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-J082bBTiEk8/XA9GITWPkBI/AAAAAAAASpU/uktzoDCLfbUqR4bbArea0QPxq6vSVmDXACLcBGAs/s200/rising%2Babove.jpg" width="131" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2rvyDSH" target="_blank">Rising Above: How 11 Athletes Overcame Challenges in Their Youth to Become Stars</a></b>, by Gregory Zuckerman with Elijah Zuckerman and Gabriel Zuckerman:&nbsp; Names like Lebron James, Steph Curry, Tim Howard, &amp; Dwyane Wade will pull in young readers. Strong, accessible writing and inspiring stories will keep them reading. Look for the second in this series, focusing on inspiring women in sports.&nbsp;<i>(ages 10-14)</i><br /><br /><div><b>Fiction for young players</b></div><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2PwI11O" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1456" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-agfy1NA-UE8/XA9GYI5zwpI/AAAAAAAASpc/SDjBXp2Qc0kJJdbO8Bqb3VZfT6czKGzbQCLcBGAs/s200/pedro%2527s%2Bbig%2Bgoal.jpg" width="136" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2PwI11O" target="_blank">Pedro’s Big Goal</a></b>, by Fran Manushkin, illustrated by Tammie Lyon (Picture Window / Capstone; ages 5-8; $4.95; 32 pp.). First grader Pedro LOVES playing soccer with his friends and dreams of playing goalie. Will he make it as his team’s goalie, or is he too small? Beginning readers will enjoy this fun, accessible series -- perfect for 1st and 2nd graders.&nbsp;<i>(ages 5-8)</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QOz88w" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="489" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-fwcidoibmDk/XA9Gn-2ejtI/AAAAAAAASpg/5zlvC6TKMMQ8T8VnF1wATEz0iv2HMK8FQCLcBGAs/s200/sf%2Bsplash.jpg" width="135" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QOz88w" target="_blank">The San Francisco Splash</a></b>, by David A. Kelley, illustrated by Mark Meyers: <b>The Ballpark Mysteries</b> series is great for emerging readers who need short chapter books, and this local story does not disappoint. Cousins Kate and Mike love it when Kate’s sports-reporter mom brings them to a game, and here they start in kayaks out in McCovey Cove trying to catch fly balls.&nbsp;<i>(ages 6-10)</i><br /><br /><b>Middle grade &amp; young adult fiction</b><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2rxKmAd" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1500" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OthSM89XU3Y/XA9KCalBp2I/AAAAAAAASpw/zihGjcOgYGMn2BHPTqjzTYTntpUhHoITQCLcBGAs/s200/after%2Bthe%2Bshot%2Bdrops.jpg" width="133" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2rxKmAd" target="_blank">After the Shot Drops</a></b>, by Randy Ribay: When high school basketball star "Bunny" Thompson transfers to wealthy private school, where he is one of a handful of black students. Bunny struggles to keep true to himself, stay close to his neighborhood friends, and make new friends at school. Meanwhile, his best friend Nasir struggles with feeling left behind and figuring out what to do when his cousin starts getting into trouble. The conflicts escalate, on the court and off, with an explosive climax. Hand this to fans of <b>The Hate U Give</b> and <b>Ghost</b>.&nbsp;<i>(ages 13-18)</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QpH68H" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1530" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-vcKNOWBwoE8/XA9KXTEy3jI/AAAAAAAASp4/A-LTLGzgfRY7982vdpjxfaxbVLt3jfFfQCLcBGAs/s200/ghost%2Breynolds.jpg" width="130" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QpH68H" target="_blank">Ghost (Track #1)</a></b>, by Jason Reynolds: BOOM! Third time reading this and it still pulls me straight through each time. A 5th grader told me: "I loved how you feel like you're Ghost. You get mad at someone, then forgive them. It feels like your emotions are building up until Ghost takes the shoes. Then they break when his coach brings him back to the store." Catch others in this stand-out series: Patina &amp; Sunny.&nbsp;<i>(ages 9-14)</i><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2UEZr0e" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1511" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-324hB9bYj-Y/XA9Klt3jqvI/AAAAAAAASp8/xnK9Sxhuz4kWGj3ycTpGpB4HGPs7IJOKQCLcBGAs/s200/rebound.jpg" width="131" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2UEZr0e" target="_blank">Rebound</a></b>, by Kwame Alexander: My students clamored to read Kwame Alexander’s <b>The Crossover</b>, and this prequel is outstanding, with Chuck Bell--Josh &amp; Jordan’s father--taking center stage. Kwame creates a great cast of characters in Rebound, with Charlie's family and close friends. I especially love that two of his close friends are girls. CJ is brainy, sassy and sweet. Roxie can play ball better than most of the boys. Full of humor, heart and poetry slam in comics (!!), this novel in verse is really about how we can hold onto hope even though we feel storm-beaten and shattered.&nbsp;<i>(ages 9-14)</i><br /><br />If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=98mv1hiuEYk:hxtH2pz0d1A:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=98mv1hiuEYk:hxtH2pz0d1A:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=98mv1hiuEYk:hxtH2pz0d1A:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/98mv1hiuEYk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-winning-sports-books.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-21827531667184410502018-12-10T18:00:00.000-08:002018-12-10T20:24:09.366-08:00Ten terrific fantasy books (ages 4-14)Many students are drawn to fantasies with richly imagined worlds. Here are some favorites for a wide range of ages -- enjoy getting lost in these wonderful worlds. This is an eclectic mix of picture books, graphic novels, middle grade novels and young adult fantasies. To explore a wider range, check out <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/1610575-mary-ann?shelf=fantasy" target="_blank">my Goodreads fantasy shelf</a>.<br /><br />As you look for fantasy books for children, please pay special attention to the variety of characters, legends and racial/ethnic groups represented.<br /><br /><b>Picture books</b><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2EbhWmY" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="720" data-original-width="803" height="178" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-7JMo6WcS19g/XA35YOj4ypI/AAAAAAAASnA/CP6YEnI4bakcI5ik_VEqrZDc-KjSi2LLQCLcBGAs/s200/journey.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2EbhWmY" target="_blank">Journey</a></b>, by Aaron Becker: In this sweeping wordless picture book, a lonely girl escapes to a magical world with the help of a red crayon. She travels through several worlds, friendly and hostile, discovering her inner strength as she escapes an army of warlords. Lush illustrations bring these imaginative worlds vividly to life.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2L4RcpC" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="330" data-original-width="330" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-X0EA7v_qXTE/XA36BRkYXYI/AAAAAAAASnI/_vAj3d2krr87Afb7rVLkDd9Y8l5heSAvgCLcBGAs/s200/man%2Bin%2Bthe%2Bmoon.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2L4RcpC" target="_blank">The Man in the Moon</a></b>, by William Joyce: This gorgeous, imaginative picture book opens the series for the Guardians of Childhood, introducing readers to the fantastical legend of the Man in the Moon (MiM). When the wicked Pitch, the King of Nightmares, kills MiM’s parents in an epic battle, the baby MiM is whisked to safety by his guardian Nightlight. As MiM grows up, he is determined to watch over the children of Earth, like Nightlight watched over him.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2L7vZM3" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="822" data-original-width="1000" height="164" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-uqdt_rVCxwo/XA36QRnSIWI/AAAAAAAASnM/L3LpOFncdzkKgSFh_IAmQGiEpg_FuQ0RACLcBGAs/s200/ocean%2Bmeets%2Bsky.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2L7vZM3" target="_blank">Ocean Meets Sky</a></b>, by Terry Fan and Eric Fan: In honor of his grandfather who has passed away, young Finn builds a boat for the journey they always wanted to take. Finn then crawls inside to sleep and dreams of a massive golden fish who takes him on a journey, in search of the magical land of his grandfather’s stories. Filled with atmospheric blend of Asian imagery and dreamlike fantasy worlds, this beautiful, magical picture book immerses readers into a young boy’s search for healing.<br /><br /><b>Middle Grade Novels</b><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2UuLeCX" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1493" data-original-width="1001" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-P8Wg_H5ZnWw/XA36vK4WKGI/AAAAAAAASnY/XZFgVCutNDYncoK5hZDeVBauTpo-QvzbQCLcBGAs/s200/aru%2Bshah.jpg" width="133" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2UuLeCX" target="_blank">Aru Shah and the End of Time</a></b>, by Roshani Chokshi: When 7th grader Aru Shah lights the cursed Lamp of Bharata in her mother’s museum, she is thrown into the world of Hindu gods and mythical characters. Aru discovers she has been born with the soul of a Pandava brother, and she must use her powers to defeat the Lord of Darkness. Chokshi draws readers into an immersive world intertwining Hindu folklore, feminist outlook and action-packed thrills.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2Pupjbc" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="971" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Gv1Kwu_Xk78/XA38uwxtVwI/AAAAAAAASns/5fewOn2m8fw2BvcLG-xgNbPfuS6XpLm2QCLcBGAs/s200/endling.jpg" width="121" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Pupjbc" target="_blank">Endling: The Last</a></b>, by Katherine Applegate: Perfect for fans of Erin Hunter’s <i>Warriors</i> series, Endling layers excitement, fantasy and probing questions about survival. Byx, a young dairne (imagine a human/dog mix), must survive alone after her entire clan is murdered by the power-hungry humans. With the help of two new friends, she seeks answers and the mythic Dairneholm in this epic fantasy novel.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2SC8ywy" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="750" data-original-width="511" height="200" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-XRR35-FDE3U/XA39RRBzFbI/AAAAAAAASn0/fde_6LtLHtEIOr3jDt0EstOPyoOHKdqIgCLcBGAs/s200/where%2Bthe%2Bmountain%2Bmeets%2Bthe%2Bmoon.jpeg" width="135" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2SC8ywy" target="_blank">Where the Mountain Meets the Moon</a></b>, by Grace Lin: Grace Lin blends Chinese folktales with an epic quest in this enchanting novel. Like her father, Minli is a dreamer and loves stories. Hoping to bring her family good fortune, she seeks the Old Man of the Moon, for he might be able to share his secrets with her. Lovely illustrations intersperse the main action and folktales, all influenced by traditional Chinese stories and art. Readers will be inspired by Minli’s courage, loyalty and quick thinking.<br /><br /><b>Graphic Novels</b><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-oiaZnwDSy3I/XA36_DpANsI/AAAAAAAASng/h6lT6L9T7qwpq2_JLmDdZoRgOXvT131rwCLcBGAs/s1600/chasma%2Bknights.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1276" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-oiaZnwDSy3I/XA36_DpANsI/AAAAAAAASng/h6lT6L9T7qwpq2_JLmDdZoRgOXvT131rwCLcBGAs/s200/chasma%2Bknights.jpg" width="156" /></a><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QLOZVi" target="_blank">Chasma Knights</a></b>, by Boya Sun and Kate Reed Petty: In this delightful graphic novel, Knights can “catalyze” with their toys, merging and mind-melding their powers. Young readers will empathize with outcast Beryl, who yearns to catalyze with toys, and imagine ways their toys can come to life in this inventive story.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2Pu9aTg" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="940" data-original-width="600" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-K-WllbYFKBc/XA39lDR5Q_I/AAAAAAAASn8/331ms_ELVDIy6sZCfTZHIbj5LN2iqTbSgCLcBGAs/s200/princeless.jpg" width="127" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Pu9aTg" target="_blank">Princeless #1: Save Yourself</a></b>, by Jeremy Whitley, illustrated by M. Goodwin: When Princess Adrienne’s parents lock her away in a castle guarded by a dragon to await rescue by a prince, she decides to take matters into her own hands. I love this feisty heroine--we have so few stories with characters of color, where race isn’t an issue. Readers are able to enjoy classic fairy tale setting in this graphic novel, while turning so many stereotypes and tropes on their heads.<br /><br /><br /><b>Young Adult fantasies</b><br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2Pur9J5" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1510" data-original-width="1001" height="200" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-lLSRqXyhLZg/XA4BbZLPeiI/AAAAAAAASoY/w8wm1ETm_7gLzQrGaIVGPpnq7gNV9oZ-wCLcBGAs/s200/children%2Bblood%2Bbone.jpg" width="131" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Pur9J5" target="_blank">Children of Blood and Bone</a></b>, by Tomi Adeyemi: Seventeen-year-old Zélie must save her community of diviners from the king's vengeful genocide in this exciting blockbuster debut. I was captivated by the richly drawn fantasy world full of West Africa imagery, but the action-packed chase and shifting allegiances are what kept me hooked. The Legacy of OrÏsha will continue next spring, as Adeyemi releases the second in the series: <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Pu8T2K" target="_blank">Children of Virtue and Vengeance</a></b>.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2UvDOz5" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1500" data-original-width="1000" height="200" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-RojLtYYlyS8/XA4BAgzgIPI/AAAAAAAASoM/Oymq0vPvwnIVVn2GP07KaqGZ1lm4AhFaQCLcBGAs/s200/warcross.jpg" width="133" /></a></div><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2UvDOz5" target="_blank">Warcross</a></b>, by Marie Lu: Combining fast-action video game battles with intriguing underworld mysteries, Marie Lu hooks readers with a perfect series-opener. Emika Chen hacks into the immersive virtual reality game Warcross championship games, but instead of getting into trouble, she's invited to meet the game's creator, who's picked her for a top-secret job. As she uncovers a sinister plot, Emi must choose whom to trust. "Absolutely immersive. Cannot put this down," is what I wrote to myself as I zoomed through this.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=vKcUEl92nFQ:uyrzvb_9k_8:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=vKcUEl92nFQ:uyrzvb_9k_8:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=vKcUEl92nFQ:uyrzvb_9k_8:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/vKcUEl92nFQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-terrific-fantasy-novels.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-72433728215804985012018-12-09T21:17:00.000-08:002018-12-19T22:20:44.425-08:00A season for celebrating! 10 years of Great Kid Books<div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dciFCykIqRI/XA30fThHINI/AAAAAAAASm0/u4VNisDYatgruXGk1yZZi1v_o9dyzfbdgCLcBGAs/s1600/banner-1193261.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="697" data-original-width="1600" height="139" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dciFCykIqRI/XA30fThHINI/AAAAAAAASm0/u4VNisDYatgruXGk1yZZi1v_o9dyzfbdgCLcBGAs/s320/banner-1193261.jpg" width="320" /></a></div>Ten years ago, I started this website as a place to share book recommendations with parents. I wanted to tell parents not only about books I loved, but also ones I saw children responding to.<br /><br />I was struck by how often I felt overwhelmed as a young parent, looking for books for my children. They were drawn to familiar series and characters, often those they recognized from TV. I recognized classics. But how could I sort through the hundreds of new books for children, and know what they would enjoy?<br /><br />Over the past ten years, I have written over 1,000 posts sharing books for children ages 4 to 14. This has brought me great joy and has broadened my own world immensely. I am so grateful to the authors and illustrators who create wonderful books for children. I also appreciate the kidlit community of librarians and bloggers that I have found both online and in person.<br /><br />To celebrate, I will be sharing ten lists this season, each with ten terrific titles both new and old. I will also be randomly giving away books to share -- so please leave comments about what books you are excited to share with young readers in your life. I'll link here as the posts go live.<br /><br /><ol><li><a href="https://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-terrific-fantasy-novels.html" target="_blank">Ten terrific fantasy books</a>&nbsp;</li><li><a href="https://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-winning-sports-books.html" target="_blank">Ten winning sports books</a></li><li><a href="https://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-top-books-for-speaking-your-truth.html" target="_blank">Ten top books for speaking your truth</a></li><li><a href="https://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-outstanding-audiobooks.html" target="_blank">Ten outstanding audiobooks</a></li><li><a href="https://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-terrific-chapter-books.html" target="_blank">Ten terrific chapter books for growing readers</a></li><li><a href="https://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-favorite-picture-books-ages-3-10.html" target="_blank">Ten favorite picture books</a></li><li><a href="https://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-funny-books-to-get-you-laughing.html" target="_blank">Ten funny books to get you laughing</a></li><li><a href="https://kidmode.me/2018/12/ten-graphic-novels.html" target="_blank">Ten graphic novels to read again &amp; again</a></li><li>Ten swoon-worthy first romances</li><li>Ten inspiring biographies &amp; memoirs</li></ol><br />Thank you, dear readers, for your patience this fall. I've started a new job as the librarian at Albany High School, just north of Berkeley, CA. It's exciting to be in a new school, and it's taken a huge amount of energy to step into this new role. I have had to write less here, as I spend more time teaching, planning and grading at the high school.<br /><br />Above all else, thank you my readers for encouraging me, for recognizing the importance of sharing books with young readers.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=ZtAf_4eeb4A:d-qhpcJfSOs:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=ZtAf_4eeb4A:d-qhpcJfSOs:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=ZtAf_4eeb4A:d-qhpcJfSOs:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/ZtAf_4eeb4A" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com8http://kidmode.me/2018/12/a-season-for-celebrating-10-years-of.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-32194581940826346112018-10-03T06:00:00.000-07:002018-10-03T06:00:05.804-07:00Lowriders Blast from the Past, by Cathy Camper & Raul the Third -- outstanding graphic novel (ages 8-14)Do you have kids who love cars? Who doodle and draw all the time? Who only read graphic novels? You'll want to race out to get <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QvCtpx" target="_blank">Lowriders Blast from the Past</a></b>, the newest graphic novel from Cathy Camper and Raul the Third. Not only does this celebrate Latinx lowrider culture, it turns cultural expectations on its head with Lupe's girl-power &amp; fixit prowess.<br /><br />As we celebrate Latinx and Hispanic Heritage Month, you'll definitely want to highlight this series. My students especially appreciate the mashup of cultures, the humor and the Spanish slang.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-MQxrYj3N2Zk/W7RJ5kpetSI/AAAAAAAASgY/5tpNkJytu0sTqJ_YnB94YXOP2Es1YtBEwCLcBGAs/s1600/lowriders%2Bblast%2Bfrom%2Bthe%2Bpast.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1238" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-MQxrYj3N2Zk/W7RJ5kpetSI/AAAAAAAASgY/5tpNkJytu0sTqJ_YnB94YXOP2Es1YtBEwCLcBGAs/s320/lowriders%2Bblast%2Bfrom%2Bthe%2Bpast.jpg" width="258" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QvCtpx" target="_blank">Lowriders Blast from the Past</a></b><br />by <a href="https://cathycamper.com/" target="_blank">Cathy Camper</a> and Raul the Third<br />Chronicle, 2018<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2QvCtpx" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/990803166" target="_blank">Your local library</a><br />ages 8-14</blockquote>This story brings us back to the origins of Lupe, Flapjack and Elirio's friendship. Mosquito Elirio loves painting more than anything else, especially mixing words with art. He paints giant murals on an alley wall near his home.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-NutEhZrEJdI/W7RMQ1pIJKI/AAAAAAAASgk/zh7XynLI7lUDZaa1Xg58d5KdhPxq-vxSACLcBGAs/s1600/Lowriders%2BBlast%2Bfrom%2Bthe%2BPast_Int%2Bpg%2B18-19.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="768" data-original-width="1198" height="256" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-NutEhZrEJdI/W7RMQ1pIJKI/AAAAAAAASgk/zh7XynLI7lUDZaa1Xg58d5KdhPxq-vxSACLcBGAs/s400/Lowriders%2BBlast%2Bfrom%2Bthe%2BPast_Int%2Bpg%2B18-19.JPG" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"This alley wall is my secret studio.<br />It's like my own museum."</td></tr></tbody></table>But when Elirio&nbsp;is bullied by Las Matamoscas, the local gang, he feels alone and helpless, until he meets two new friends, Flapjack and Lupe.&nbsp; Flapjack is a sweet little octopus who's always willing to lend a hand (or eight). And Lupe can fix anything, especially bicycles and cars.<br /><br />I especially appreciate how this series turns cultural expectations upside down. Not only is Lupe a fixit whiz, her Mamá Impala runs the junk store, and her Mamá Gazelle runs a papel picado workshop.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-YlfrotyOJ3c/W7RNPix296I/AAAAAAAASgs/Ti9KN173smoBDOKHHHCjzavC2NgrIbq6QCLcBGAs/s1600/Lowriders%2BBlast%2Bfrom%2Bthe%2BPast_Int%2Bpg%2B53.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="766" data-original-width="596" height="400" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-YlfrotyOJ3c/W7RNPix296I/AAAAAAAASgs/Ti9KN173smoBDOKHHHCjzavC2NgrIbq6QCLcBGAs/s400/Lowriders%2BBlast%2Bfrom%2Bthe%2BPast_Int%2Bpg%2B53.JPG" width="310" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"Mama Gazelle's workshop is pretty awesome, right? <br />Want to watch me fix your bike?"</td></tr></tbody></table>Elirio, Flapjack and Lupe are excited to go to Señor Bufolardo's car show. The bullies won't leave the younger kids alone--and they insist that girls can't be in car shows. Will the friends figure out how to get their mamas' car entered, or will the bullies win?<br /><br />If you like this, you'll also want to get the first two in the series:<br /><ul><li><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2IAqDYi" target="_blank">Lowriders in Space</a></b></li><li><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2DU9Bpk" target="_blank">Lowriders to the Center of the Earth</a></b></li></ul>Raul the Third won the <a href="http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2017/01/ra-l-gonzalez-juana-medina-win-pura-belpr-awards" target="_blank"><b>2017 Pura Belpré Illustrator Award</b></a>&nbsp;for <b>Lowriders to the Center of the Earth</b>, honored for his "energetic ballpoint pen drawings portray a complex mash-up of cultures with humor and verve," as the committee chair Eva Mitnick said.<br /><br />Illustrations copyright ©2018 Raul the Third, shared by permission of the publishers. The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Chronicle Books. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=i8tyMwzFaiI:PmCrNWCf_w0:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=i8tyMwzFaiI:PmCrNWCf_w0:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=i8tyMwzFaiI:PmCrNWCf_w0:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/i8tyMwzFaiI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/10/lowriders-blast-from-past.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-73458950470963290232018-09-30T21:18:00.000-07:002018-09-30T21:18:04.026-07:00Tackling Issues: an interview with Katherine Applegate & Jen Petro-Roy (ages 8-14)<a href="http://katherineapplegate.com/" target="_blank">Katherine Applegate</a> is one of my students’ favorite authors. Her books include <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2xSFIAh" target="_blank">Home of the Brave</a></b>&nbsp;and <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QjTmTS" target="_blank">wishtree</a></b>, both of which center around the experience of young immigrants. <a href="https://www.jenpetroroy.com/" target="_blank">Jen Petro-Roy</a> is a vital new voice for young readers. Her debut novel <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2NQULV2" target="_blank">P.S. I Miss You</a></b> has garnered national attention for centering on young same-sex love. I’m excited to welcome them as we explore how fiction engages kids as they think about difficult subjects. <br /><br />This conversation came out of our panel together at the Bay Area Book Festival last spring. I am so lucky to know these talented, thoughtful women.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-o_BjVUiCyMQ/W7Gf70wWseI/AAAAAAAASfs/xJ6ipxoYxfUmnkgVM3i2S8nUj-h5GBYpwCLcBGAs/s1600/GPS%2Bfor%2Bour%2Bhearts%2B%25281%2529.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="800" data-original-width="800" height="320" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-o_BjVUiCyMQ/W7Gf70wWseI/AAAAAAAASfs/xJ6ipxoYxfUmnkgVM3i2S8nUj-h5GBYpwCLcBGAs/s320/GPS%2Bfor%2Bour%2Bhearts%2B%25281%2529.png" width="320" /></a></div><b>Mary Ann</b>: Katherine, You’ve written for many age levels, from very young children to adults, yet it seems that your sweet spot is middle grade. What draws you to this age group?<br /><br /><b>Katherine</b>: You’re right that middle grade readers are my favorite audience. Typically that’s defined as children 8 to 12 years of age. Children this age are beginning to think about the wider world. They start asking Big Questions (to the delight and frustration of the adults in their lives): <i>What does fairness mean? Why is there cruelty in the world? What defines who I am? Why did Joey get the biggest meatball?</i><br /><br />I just wrote an introduction to an essay collection by the beloved children’s writer, Natalie Babbitt (<b><a href="https://amzn.to/2RgfrnN" target="_blank">Barking with the Big Dogs: On Writing and Reading Books for Children</a></b>, coming out on November 20, 2018). Babbitt is perhaps best known for her remarkable novel for middle grade readers, <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2DGjdnm" target="_blank">Tuck Everlasting</a></b>, which Anne Tyler called “one of the best books ever written -- for any age.” <br /><br />And what is <b>Tuck</b> about, this little book for children? Immortality. Why we have to die. What matters most in our short and magical lives. All those things we try not to think about . . . and absolutely must think about.<br /><br />And it’s a book for kids. <br /><br />That’s why I love writing for middle grade readers.<br /><br /><b>Mary Ann</b>: You're so right -- kids are really beginning to wrestle with big issues. Jen, what has been your experience?<br /><br /><b>Jen</b>: In my job as a librarian, I found that kids often sought out books about tough topics. They want to read about kids going through struggles--with homelessness, with difficult family situations, with friend troubles, with illness, and more--because they are often going through the same struggles themselves.<br /><br />When I'm reading, it’s reassuring to see that I’m not the only one going through a specific situation...and it’s even more reassuring to see that characters can find their way through, triumph, and thrive. For kids, this is an even more necessary process, because they don’t have as much life experience. They <i>need</i> to see that representation on the page and they truly want to. It makes them feel so much less alone...and isn’t that one of the aims of literature?<br /><br /><b>Katherine:</b> I love your point about literature helping us feel less, alone, Jen. That’s probably the greatest gift books can give us. That, and helping us make sense of a world that doesn’t always make sense. (That’s particularly true lately.)<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2NQULV2" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1511" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-aUl5Swlw4ZQ/W7GXdm4VRsI/AAAAAAAASe8/3qaZ4LURmN4_siuV1OVboephrmp5lWh-gCLcBGAs/s320/P.s.%2BI%2Bmiss%2Byou.jpg" width="211" /></a></div><b>Mary Ann:</b>&nbsp;Jen, can you tell us a little bit about the issues Evie has to wrestle with in&nbsp;<b><a href="https://amzn.to/2NQULV2" target="_blank">P.S. I Miss You</a></b>?<br /><br /><b>Jen:</b>&nbsp;After being raised in a very Catholic family, Evie starts to question the beliefs of her parents after her older sister gets pregnant and Evie herself gets her first crush on a girl. Teen pregnancy, religion, and sexuality are definitely three “tough issues” and many have questioned why I raised them in a middle-grade novel. For me, though, this was exactly the place to raise it, because middle school is the time when kids start to question the world, who they are, and how they were raised. It’s so important that these kids can see themselves now, and don’t have to wait until they’re teens or even adults to see themselves represented in literature. At the same time, though, I love hearing about teenagers and adults reading&nbsp;<b><a href="https://amzn.to/2NQULV2" target="_blank">P.S. I Miss You</a></b>. I think it helps different age groups in different ways.<br /><br /><b>Mary Ann:&nbsp;</b>Have you heard from young readers about the tough issues you bring up in your books? How have they reacted? What do they find powerful?<br /><br /><b>Jen:&nbsp;</b>Hearing from and interacting with readers is my absolute favorite part of this job. I’ve heard from a bunch so far about how wonderful it is to see representation of different sexualities in books for their age group. After one of my school visits, I had a girl come up to me and share that she’s a queer middle schooler with a brother about to go off to college, and she really related to Evie, who writes letters to her older sister Cilla. I am so proud to be able to help people feel a little bit less alone.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2QfYjx0" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1441" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-O30fDKQHRpo/W7GX61kwTHI/AAAAAAAASfE/2tnn2r26c6UUhe29gx9K7RAFLHX-CT41QCLcBGAs/s320/wishtree.jpg" width="222" /></a></div><b>Mary Ann:</b>&nbsp;Katherine, with&nbsp;<b><a href="https://amzn.to/2QjTmTS" target="_blank">wishtree</a></b>&nbsp;you tackle tough issues around immigration and racism, and yet you do this in a way that 3nd graders can relate to. Do you keep the age of your audience in mind while you write?<br /><br /><b>Katherine:</b>&nbsp;I do, very much so. (Although I know many writers for children who say the age of the audience doesn’t figure into their writing.) School visits have helped me a lot in this regard. I see the innocence and the honesty in younger readers, and I try to write what they need to hear. If it works for other ages, great.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2NTFEKH" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1600" data-original-width="971" height="320" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-dqIKgq6EcJE/W7GYRfVfBLI/AAAAAAAASfM/x1yrnRQDmPURI5s7CdmZBW5eLMYZiTWJQCLcBGAs/s320/endling.jpg" width="194" /></a></div><b>Mary Ann:</b>&nbsp;One of my students, Clara, told me that books “give kids an idea of how the world can be and how we can change it.” Katherine, while&nbsp;<b><a href="https://amzn.to/2NTFEKH" target="_blank">Endling</a></b>&nbsp;is clearly fantasy, what are you hoping that readers think about while they read it?<br /><br /><b>Katherine:</b>&nbsp;<b><a href="https://amzn.to/2NTFEKH" target="_blank">Endling</a></b>&nbsp;is a fantasy about the last individual in a doglike species. Here in the real world, we’re in the midst of what is often referred to as the Sixth Extinction, a huge loss of species that seems to be almost entirely the result of human behavior. I wanted to touch on that, but in a way that I hope is accessible to younger readers.<br /><b><br /></b> <b>Mary Ann: </b>What do you think parents or teachers are afraid of when they push back against “heavy” or “mature” books for kids?<br /><br /><b>Jen:</b> As a parent myself, I can understand the impulse to shield kids from tough issues. The world is scary, and it’s even more frightening to think of innocence being shattered. I wish the world was perfect for my daughters, and I wish they could believe it was so. So when parents push back, I think a lot of that impulse comes from fear or the desire to avoid discomfort. It’s hard to imagine explaining things like school shootings or death to children, so it can be easier to avoid the topic entirely. And for issues that parents or teachers don’t believe in, it may be “easier” to ban books or topics entirely. Out of sight, out of mind, after all. The problem there is that issues never remain out of sight. And when kids don’t know the realities of the world, those realities will be that much harder to deal with in the future. They won’t learn tolerance or acceptance, either.<br /><br /><b>Katherine:</b> This is why librarians were invented. To get books into the hands of the children who most need them.<br /><br /><b>Mary Ann:</b> Many of my students are drawn to realistic fiction that deals with tough issues. Why do you think this is? How do stories help us?<br /><br /><b>Katherine: </b>When you’re in the middle of figuring out your place in the world, it helps to have a map. Books are like GPS for our hearts. They help us navigate the hard stuff. <br /><br />I’ve had OCD since I was a kid. A book like <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2zHrjsd" target="_blank">OCDaniel</a></b> (by Wesley King) would have changed my life.<br /><br />I have a trans daughter who’s 21. I wish Alex Gino’s <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Qg0bG2" target="_blank">George</a></b> had been around for her when she needed it. <br /><br />I know too many young girls on their way to eating disorders. I’d love to get Jen’s upcoming novel, <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Qlo6DV" target="_blank">Good Enough</a></b>, into all their hands.<br /><br /><b>Jen:</b> Stories help us feel like we’re not alone in the world, that we’re not the only one dealing with certain issues. Readers can think, “Hey, if that character can get through such a difficult situation, maybe I can, too.” Simply seeing that books like this exist can make readers feel a sense of belonging, too. If readers see LGBTQ books in libraries or classrooms or are handed a book by their parents, they will know that those authority figures are safe and accepting. That they can go to them if they need to talk. Books can help facilitate a community of love and acceptance, and I love that about them.<br /><br /><b>Mary Ann: </b>Jen, can you tell us a little about your upcoming books? With Katherine raving about them, I can't wait to know more!<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2OmZ5eb" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1546" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-0ZN4kJBwvQ4/W7GYwq9DX9I/AAAAAAAASfU/ZCykdpSUntASIUJ7WRhg2ZCaUzaRMoHAwCLcBGAs/s320/good%2Benough.jpg" width="206" /></a></div><b>Jen:</b> Absolutely! I have two more books coming out in next year, both out on February 19th. <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2OmZ5eb" target="_blank">Good Enough</a></b> is another middle-grade fiction, about a 12-year-old named Riley who has been hospitalized for anorexia nervosa and is struggling to recover amidst parents who don’t understand, a fellow patient who is trying to sabotage Riley, and a gymnastic star sister. I’m so proud of this book, as it was inspired by my own struggle and recovery from anorexia, and there’s not much out there in this area for young readers that is both hopeful and non-triggering. Macmillan/Feiwel &amp; Friends will also be simultaneously releasing <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2IrILnb" target="_blank">You Are Enough</a></b>, which is a non-fiction guide to eating disorder recovery, body image, and self-esteem for middle-schoolers and teens. Advanced copies of both are starting to make their way in the world!<br /><br /><b>Katherine:</b> As an early reader, I can offer this spoiler alert: <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2Oqo9B2" target="_blank">Good Enough</a></b> is amazing. It belongs in every library.<br /><br /><b>Mary Ann: </b>I wonder if you can end with any advice for parents about reading.<br /><br /><b>Jen: </b>Reading is anything your kids want it to be. As a former librarian, I’m familiar with parents steering their children away from books they don’t think are “real literature.” They don’t want their kids to read graphic novels or those easy chapter books with mermaids and puppy dogs on the covers. But any kinds of books are good. Kids thrive when they are reading the books they want, whether it’s a book filled with fart jokes or <b>War and Peace</b>. Let them follow their interests. Let them love the written word.<br /><br /><b>Katherine: </b>Couldn’t agree with Jen more. Reading is supposed to be fun, people! <br /><br />I was a reluctant reader myself, and it took me a long time to find my “perfect” book. For me, it was <b>Charlotte's Web</b>. But for your child, it may be a graphic novel. Or non-fiction. Or a picture book. Or a chapter book. Or poetry. Or song lyrics. <br /><br />It’s all about words. It doesn’t matter how they’re packaged. It only matters how much they’re loved.<br /><br />Thank you both so much for your time and all of the care and love you pour into your stories. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=8NZhm8D9ulc:UGn3XatWHgM:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=8NZhm8D9ulc:UGn3XatWHgM:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=8NZhm8D9ulc:UGn3XatWHgM:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/8NZhm8D9ulc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/09/tackling-issues-interview-with.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-27149983576972165782018-09-24T22:05:00.001-07:002018-09-24T22:05:59.594-07:00Celebrating the Harvest Moon with two beautiful picture books (ages 3-8)Cultures around the world celebrate the harvest every autumn, and many involve tribute to the glorious harvest moon. Two of my favorite new picture books honor both the magic of the moon and the importance of family. Both books connect to Asian traditions, and they also reflect North American families celebrating both their American and Asian identities.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2MTWfIZ" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="750" data-original-width="964" height="248" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-KMWy6ao4L0Q/W6mxiGhQyPI/AAAAAAAASdE/i7Xuk-_bAwE7NVm55poPoNCVSkSzkmdFACLcBGAs/s320/Big%2BMooncake%2Bfor%2BLittle%2BStar.jpeg" width="320" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2MTWfIZ" target="_blank">A Big Mooncake for Little Star</a></b><br />by Grace Lin<br />Little Brown, 2018<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2MTWfIZ" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/962749887" target="_blank">Your local library</a> / <a href="https://www.lbyr.com/titles/grace-lin/a-big-mooncake-for-little-star/9780316411400/" target="_blank">Book chat</a> with Grace Lin<br />ages 3-8<br />*<a href="https://kidmode.me/search/label/best%20new%20book" target="_blank">best new book</a>*</blockquote>Little Star and her mother bake an enormous mooncake, sharing the joy of baking together. Mama tells Little Star she mustn't eat any yet. Little Star does her best and goes to bed, but when she wakes up in the middle of the night it's just too hard to resist a tiny nibble.<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">Would her mama notice if she took a tiny nibble? Little Star didn't think so. <i>Mmmm, yum!</i></blockquote>As each night passes, Little Star wakes in the middle of the night thinking only of the Big Mooncake. Just one more little bite, and she'll race back to bed. Young readers will smile as the mooncake slowly disappears, recognizing the phases of the moon.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bp8tnUi3it8/W6m4ueVIt6I/AAAAAAAASdU/iifenyy95gokDJxZThcpvs6mMrBRJlZUACLcBGAs/s1600/Big%2BMooncake%2Bfor%2BLittle%2BStar%2Binterior1.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="386" data-original-width="1000" height="153" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bp8tnUi3it8/W6m4ueVIt6I/AAAAAAAASdU/iifenyy95gokDJxZThcpvs6mMrBRJlZUACLcBGAs/s400/Big%2BMooncake%2Bfor%2BLittle%2BStar%2Binterior1.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"Night after night,<br />Little Star took tiny nibble<br />after tiny nibble<br />of the Big Mooncake."</td></tr></tbody></table>Grace Lin creates a story filled with delight and love. In her author's note, she describes how this story celebrates the Chinese Mid-Autumn Moon Festival, yet she is creating a new story here, one that reflects her experience as a mother.<br /><br />I especially appreciate her <a href="https://vimeo.com/283726917" target="_blank">video book chat</a>, in which she describes the importance of using her work to explore the American side of her identity. I hadn't noticed the explicit nods to Blueberries for Sal before Lin pointed them out, but I certainly felt kinship toward this mother-daughter delighting in baking together.<br /><br /><b><a href="http://www.thefanbrothers.com/ocean-meets-sky" target="_blank">Ocean Meets Sky</a></b>, the beautiful, dreamlike new picture book from <a href="http://www.thefanbrothers.com/" target="_blank">The Fan Brothers</a>, also blends Asian and North American storytelling heritage. You'll notice nods to Sendak, Peter Pan and more.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2xQ1P9x" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="822" data-original-width="1000" height="263" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-MXM3Kk1HTBk/W6m7PKcgK0I/AAAAAAAASdk/ZmyQPQ_EFxAyM3zGNcxod9hfQQQnKEJTgCLcBGAs/s320/Ocean%2BMeets%2BSky.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2xQ1P9x" target="_blank">Ocean Meets Sky</a></b><br />by <a href="http://www.thefanbrothers.com/" target="_blank">Eric Fan and Terry Fan</a><br />Simon &amp; Schuster, 2018<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2xQ1P9x" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1033691328" target="_blank">Your local library</a> / <a href="http://www.thefanbrothers.com/ocean-meets-sky" target="_blank">preview</a> art<br />ages 4-8<br />*<a href="https://kidmode.me/search/label/best%20new%20book" target="_blank">best new book</a>*</blockquote>In honor of his grandfather who has passed away, young Finn builds a boat for the journey they always wanted to take. Finn then crawls inside to sleep and dreams of a "great golden fish" who takes him on a journey, in search of the magical land of his grandfather’s stories.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/--PmG9rZ8zq0/W6m9X-Q4z2I/AAAAAAAASdw/vrpSQ7xMaRsPf7JhTnyd5_zTcY0453MfgCLcBGAs/s1600/Ocean%2BMeets%2BSky%2Binterior1.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="422" data-original-width="1000" height="135" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/--PmG9rZ8zq0/W6m9X-Q4z2I/AAAAAAAASdw/vrpSQ7xMaRsPf7JhTnyd5_zTcY0453MfgCLcBGAs/s320/Ocean%2BMeets%2BSky%2Binterior1.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"Finn remembered Grandpa's voice<br />Telling him stories about a place far away where ocean meets sky."</td></tr></tbody></table>Finn follows the golden fish into his dreamlike world, searching for where the ocean meets the sky. He sees wondrous scenes, with whales swimming among the stars, bookish birds roosting on the Library Islands, and moon jellies dancing in the sea.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3GjfLTNOeA4/W6m_Pnn-rPI/AAAAAAAASd8/OW_o6HlHG3Ay1U6z2CB13TQQf0R4dYdTACLcBGAs/s1600/Ocean%2BMeets%2BSky%2Binterior2.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="409" data-original-width="1000" height="130" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3GjfLTNOeA4/W6m_Pnn-rPI/AAAAAAAASd8/OW_o6HlHG3Ay1U6z2CB13TQQf0R4dYdTACLcBGAs/s320/Ocean%2BMeets%2BSky%2Binterior2.jpg" width="320" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"'I didn't think the open sea would feel so lonely,'<br />Finn said after some time.<br />This caught the attention of a great golden fish."</td></tr></tbody></table>Soon Finn's boat lifts out of the water and sails into the night sky, drifting toward the great full moon. As the golden fish swims toward the moon, readers realize that his grandfather's spirit fills both the wise fish and the luminous moon.<br /><br />Filled with atmospheric blend of Asian imagery and dreamlike fantasy worlds, this beautiful, magical picture book immerses readers into a young boy’s search for healing.<br /><br />It strikes me how central storytelling is to both of these picture books, as a way for families to connect and pass down their heritage. In both, building and baking serve as a way for generations to connect, to share time and to create something together. My friends, please seek out these truly special books and share them with your families.<br /><br />Illustrations copyright ©2018 Grace Lin and ©2018 Terry Fan &amp; Eric Fan, shared by permission of the publishers. The review copies were kindly sent by the publishers, Little Brown and Simon &amp; Schuster. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=CxFH0M24hc8:f6xL5yxxKVs:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=CxFH0M24hc8:f6xL5yxxKVs:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=CxFH0M24hc8:f6xL5yxxKVs:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/CxFH0M24hc8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com1http://kidmode.me/2018/09/celebrating-harvest-moon-with-two.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-39232486191503790932018-09-20T16:19:00.000-07:002018-09-20T16:19:16.316-07:00I Have the Right To: A High School Survivor's Story of Sexual Assault, Justice, and Hope, by Chessy Prout (ages 13-18)With the news cycle focusing on Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who accused Judge Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were teenagers, I've been thinking about consent and rape culture, especially with high schoolers. This summer I listened to Chessy Prout's powerful memoir <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2DfcgJK" target="_blank">I Have the Right To: A High School Survivor's Story of Sexual Assault, Justice, and Hope</a></b>, which she narrates herself. I highly recommend this for teens, as an important personal perspective as they consider these issues.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2DfcgJK" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="464" data-original-width="400" height="320" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nLqfrqfK9YY/W6PD71wBKsI/AAAAAAAAScI/k4NYKO_XV4gTGSb51oi6_i3eXzRYMknOwCLcBGAs/s320/I%2BHave%2Bthe%2BRight%2BTo%2Baudio.jpg" width="275" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2DfcgJK" target="_blank">I Have the Right To: A High School Survivor's Story of Sexual Assault, Justice, and Hope</a></b><br />by <a href="http://ihavetherighttobook.com/" target="_blank">Chessy Prout</a>, with Jenn Abelson<br />read by Chessy Prout<br />Simon &amp; Schuster Audio / Margaret K. McElderry, 2018<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2DfcgJK" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1028554560" target="_blank">Your local library</a> / <a href="https://www.overdrive.com/media/3318277/i-have-the-right-to" target="_blank">OverDrive</a>&nbsp;audiobook preview<br />ages 13-18</blockquote>As a freshman at St. Paul’s School in New Hampshire, Chessy Prout was sexually assaulted by an upperclassman. In her raw and honest memoir, Prout shares her experience of assault and the subsequent journey with the tumultuous trial, media attention and search for healing and change. <br /><br />At the end of her freshman year, a senior by the name of Owen Labrie lured and assaulted Chessy as part of a “Senior Salute” ritual at the school. Prout has cowritten her account with journalist Abelson. I especially appreciated the way she shares about her life before and after the rape, providing context for her experience both at school and with the legal system.<br /><br />As I read this, I was particularly angered by the way the school resisted Chessy's search for justice. The case was turned over to the police and the public defender, and Chessy did find important allies. But I was struck by how the legal system does not help our young people find the resolution they need. She was&nbsp; I so wish that Chessy's school and community had used Restorative Justice practices.<br /><br />I've been inspired by&nbsp;<a href="http://impactjustice.org/restorative-justice-project/" style="font-weight: bold;" target="_blank">The Restorative Justice Project</a> at Impact Justice. This practice helps communities "address harm through dialogue among those most impacted. Restorative justice brings together those who have harmed, their victims, and affected community members into processes that repair harms and rebuild relationships."<br /><br />Chessy narrates the audiobook, balancing clarity with personal feelings, giving voice to her experience. She conveys her commitment to activism and justice for those who have experienced sexual assault. <br /><br />I recommend this memoir for both middle schools and high schools, as an important component raising awareness about the importance for consent. Today, I was struck by the podcast <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/20/podcasts/the-daily/kavanaugh-christine-blasey-ford-caitlin-flanagan-sexual-assault.html" target="_blank"><b>The Daily</b></a>, which interviewed Caitlin Flanagan, a writer for <b><a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/09/me-too/570520/" target="_blank">The Atlantic</a></b>, about her assault in high school. What's especially notable is that the high school boy apologized to Ms. Flanagan two years after he assaulted her, asking for forgiveness. This enabled her to move beyond this traumatic event.<br /><br />Chessy's memoir has an important place in the debate today around sexual assault, consent and our justice system. Please share this with teens in your lives. I highly recommend <b>I Have the Right To</b> for both middle schoolers (especially 8th graders getting ready for high school) and high schoolers. I think that many 13 and 14 year olds are ready to explore the emotional complexities and realities that Chessy describes. The review copy came from my local library, through OverDrive. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=feAuqo5Ki8k:FR-SRdw9T5k:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=feAuqo5Ki8k:FR-SRdw9T5k:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=feAuqo5Ki8k:FR-SRdw9T5k:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/feAuqo5Ki8k" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/09/i-have-right-to-high-school-survivors.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-90104366891129929422018-09-16T22:28:00.000-07:002018-09-16T22:30:30.870-07:00Tight, by Torrey Maldonado -- real boys, navigating emotionally complex decisions (ages 8-14)I've been thinking a lot about how we show our boys different ways to handle emotions, so that we are breaking the expectations of acting tough and macho. In <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2xjVP8W" target="_blank">Tight</a></b>, by Torrey Maldonado, Bryan must navigate making friends, controlling his temper and choosing the right path. Hand this to young readers who loved Jason Reynolds' <b><a href="http://kidmode.me/2017/01/ghost-by-jason-reynolds-ages-9-14.html" target="_blank">Ghost</a></b>, who want a book that feels real, and a character that is believable and emotionally honest.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2xjVP8W" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1511" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-O9zQflIwaKc/W58vEGNT9TI/AAAAAAAASbQ/nfvc4lEhwJIEKvOi-xWBQjr4SNQgfvviACLcBGAs/s320/tight.jpg" width="211" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2xjVP8W" target="_blank">Tight</a></b><br />by <a href="http://www.torreymaldonado.com/" target="_blank">Torrey Maldonado</a><br />Nancy Paulsen / Penguin, 2018<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2xjVP8W" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1015827283" target="_blank">Local library</a> / <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=FXhCDwAAQBAJ&amp;lpg=PP1&amp;dq=tight%20torrey&amp;pg=PP1#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false" target="_blank">Google Books</a> preview<br />ages 8-14<br />*<a href="http://kidmode.me/search/label/best%20new%20book" target="_blank">best new book</a>*</blockquote>I wonder what kids will think about the cover of <b>Tight</b>. Which train is Bryan going to get on? Is he struggling with a decision? Is he in a tight place? How do you feel if you're tight? What other meanings does it have? Whenever I'm showing a student a book, we spend some time wondering about the cover and thinking about its meanings.<br /><br />Bryan, an Afro-Puerto Rican sixth grader, lives in the projects in Brooklyn and generally keeps to himself, heading to his mom's office after school to do his homework, read comics or draw. His mom likes it that way, wary that he might fall in with a bad crowd. So Bryan is surprised when she encourages him to get close with Mike, a slightly older boy in their neighborhood who seems like a good kid.<br /><br />Soon Mike and Bryan become close friends, but Bryan realizes that Mike isn’t as good as Ma and others think. Bryan can't stand the way his dad and sister tease him for being "soft," and he likes some of the ways that Mike encourages him to break the rules, throwing rocks at cars from rooftops and skipping school.<br /><br />Bryan realizes that he's following Mike into more and more dangerous situations, and his honest, internal dialog shows how difficult it is to dothe right thing. When Mike asks Bryan to tell Little Kevin how great train surfing is (holding onto the outside of the train as it speeds through the tunnels), Bryan follows along even though he has misgivings:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"I start doing that, and the whole time I wonder why I don't just say what I really feel. Now it's like I'm two people. On the outside I'm promoting train-surfing so hard. On the inside, I'm like, <i>Why am I being Mike's hype-man with this?</i>"</blockquote>Torrey Maldonado skillfully creates a believable, real character facing his vulnerabilities, figuring out what it means to be a friend and how to make the right decisions. I especially appreciate the way that Bryan and Mike bond over superhero comic books and television shows. Bryan's voice is authentic, filled with slang that rings true. This is not a simple morality tale, but rather one that peels back the complex, contradictory currents that make these decisions difficult.<br /><br /><a href="http://www.torreymaldonado.com/bio.html" target="_blank">Torrey Maldonado</a> crafts such an authentic voice because it's coming from his own experience. He's a middle school teacher who "still teaches in the Brooklyn neighborhood where he was born and raised" and uses his students’ &amp; his experiences to shape his stories and characters.<br /><br />I highly recommend <b>Tight</b> for a wide age range. Although this is clearly a middle-grade novel, I think that many 13 and 14 year olds will be drawn to the emotional complexities and authentic voice that Maldonado creates. The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Nancy Paulsen / Penguin Random House. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=TFJBAccUAUs:1UqfMIJA6ck:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=TFJBAccUAUs:1UqfMIJA6ck:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=TFJBAccUAUs:1UqfMIJA6ck:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/TFJBAccUAUs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/09/tight-by-torrey-maldonado-real-boys.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-22155223440419365082018-09-13T22:19:00.001-07:002018-09-13T22:19:59.136-07:00Dactyl Hill Squad, by Daniel Jose Older -- historical fiction with social justice and dinosaurs! (ages 10-14)I'm really excited to share <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2NFIPVk" target="_blank">Dactyl Hill Squad</a></b> with my readers--my first copy went out today to a reader who loves Percy Jackson fantasies. <b>Dactyl Hill Squad</b> is a terrific mix of historical fiction, action-adventure and fantasy--with a strong underlay of social justice themes. Hand this to readers who want high energy books <i>and</i> a critical look at race relations.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2NFIPVk" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1511" data-original-width="1000" height="400" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-v5ztq5rpTq8/W5s1aY1TtoI/AAAAAAAASaY/LgFE1HTrA7wSCxd44uZVbR681TNZqzJ6ACLcBGAs/s400/dactyl%2Bhill%2Bsquad.jpg" width="263" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2NFIPVk" target="_blank">Dactyl Hill Squad</a></b><br />by Daniel José Older<br />Arthur A. Levine / Scholastic, 2018<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2xgbxC2" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1023545484" target="_blank">Local library</a> / <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=uMxKDwAAQBAJ&amp;lpg=PP1&amp;dq=dactyl%20hill&amp;pg=PP1#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false" target="_blank">Google Books</a> preview<br />ages 10-14</blockquote>Magdalys Roca chafes at the rules imposed at the Colored Orphan Asylum in Civil War era New York. Above all else, she cannot stand it when the matron calls her Margaret, instead of Madalys, her <i>real</i> name. Right from the opening page, readers know that Magdalys is strong-willed and proud of her Afro-Cuban heritage. But she also really wants to see the play at the colored theater, so she complies with the matron's demands.<br /><br />Magdalys discovers that she has a special connection with the dinosaurs that are part of everyday life in this alternative history. She discovers that she can communicate with them mentally: they hear her wishes, and she knows how they are feeling. Dinosaurs and pterodactyls are both wild and tamed, serving people as beasts of burden and roaming free.<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"It was only a few years ago that New York had passed a law granting black citizens the right to dinoride, and white people in Manhattan still bristled and stared when they saw someone with brown skin astride those massive scaly backs."</blockquote>While Magdalys and her friends are seeing the play, riots break out on the streets and their orphanage is burned down. These riots are based on the <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/the-new-york-draft-riots-of-1863/2013/04/26/a1aacf52-a620-11e2-a8e2-5b98cb59187f_story.html?noredirect=on&amp;utm_term=.756074b32278" target="_blank">Draft Riots of 1863</a>. The children flee to Brooklyn, in a neighborhood called Dactyl Hill for all of the pterodactyls that fly over the homes.&nbsp;They find refuge with the Vigilance Committee, which, as Miss Bernice explains, "helps fugitive slaves make it farther up north and works to stop the Kidnapping Club from sending our folks south to bondage."<br /><br />Once safe in Brooklyn, Magdalys and her friends form the Dactyl Hill Squad and set out to foil the Kidnapping Club, find Magdayls's brother and protect their friends. There's plenty of dinoriding, battles and near-escapes.<br /><br />I especially appreciate how Daniel José&nbsp;Older weaves together complex topics such as race, power and gender in the Civil War in the framework of an action-packed, fantastical story. He provides fascinating historical background information in his author's note.<br /><br />Given this, I do think that this story is best appreciated by kids who already understand some of the complexities of the Civil War and race relations in US history. My first reader who loved it had just finished reading Laurie Halse Anderson's <b>Chains</b> with his class, and this made a perfect follow-up. I wonder if the cover looks a little young--I imagine this working more with a middle school crowd.<br /><br />The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Scholastic. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=wLbrEoXiQuM:KEDUvjkvT5k:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=wLbrEoXiQuM:KEDUvjkvT5k:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=wLbrEoXiQuM:KEDUvjkvT5k:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/wLbrEoXiQuM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/09/dactyl-hill-squad-by-daniel-jose-older.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-80573066877697100612018-09-09T22:37:00.001-07:002018-09-09T22:37:19.420-07:00We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices, edited by Wade Hudson & Cheryl Willis Hudson -- inspiring, beautiful & uplifting (ages 8-13)As the news inundates us with the harm caused by divisive politics, institutional racism and prejudice, and angry civic discourse, what do we tell our children? How do we help give them hope, help empower them during these difficult times? <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2oUahkl" target="_blank">We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices</a></b> is an inspiring new anthology that asks 50 of the foremost children's authors and illustrators to share their love, concern and experience with the next generation.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2oUahkl" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1258" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-fSNTNEGJU0E/W5X4fLB07OI/AAAAAAAASZY/0lnDxz-yzbsiLW1qjEBf42vyXSmwhRxDgCLcBGAs/s320/we%2Brise%2Bwe%2Bresist.jpg" width="254" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2oUahkl" target="_blank">We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices</a></b><br />edited by Wade Hudson and Cheryl Willis Hudson<br />Crown Books, 2018<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2oUahkl" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1050130589" target="_blank">Local library</a> / <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=0rtFDwAAQBAJ&amp;lpg=PP1&amp;dq=we%20rise%20we%20resist&amp;pg=PP1#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false" target="_blank">Google Books</a> preview<br />ages 8-13<br />*<a href="http://kidmode.me/search/label/best%20new%20book" target="_blank">best new book</a>*</blockquote>Dedicated to "those who advocate for and pursue a just society and basic human rights for all people," this anthology presents an inspiring collection of poetry, essays, short stories and art designed to give children hope during difficult times, especially children from traditionally marginalized communities. As Ashley Bryan writes in the forward:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"Having a safe space to imagine and dream and (re)invent yourself is the first step to being happy and successful, whatever road you choose to pursue."</blockquote>This beautiful collection provides children (and the adults in their lives) this safe space. Authors ask questions, share wisdom and provide support. By doing so, they open the window to talking about these difficult times. In the opening poem, Wade Hudson asks:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"What shall we tell you when our world sometimes seems dark and uninviting?<br />What shall we tell you when hateful words that wound and bully are thrown like bricks against a wall, shattering into debris?"</blockquote>Other authors share their fears, their worries. Kwame Alexander, in his poem "A Thousand Winters," writes about when his daughter worried that the police would take him away if he was driving too fast. Our youngest children hear the news, see the reaction of adults around them, and they have questions. We must be honest with them, and yet we must also find ways to protect our children and give them hope -- for, as Kwame writes, "if we can't survive this storm, how will our children?"<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ukyJoK7J_pM/W5X7nQn5fCI/AAAAAAAASZk/iTpW3Ala6HAWssPR7M46B7vgnvDS07ZGgCLcBGAs/s1600/we%2Brise%2Bwe%2Bresist%2Binterior1.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="633" data-original-width="1000" height="252" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ukyJoK7J_pM/W5X7nQn5fCI/AAAAAAAASZk/iTpW3Ala6HAWssPR7M46B7vgnvDS07ZGgCLcBGAs/s400/we%2Brise%2Bwe%2Bresist%2Binterior1.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"A Thousand Winters," by Kwame Alexander, illustration by Eukua Holmes</td></tr></tbody></table>I especially appreciate the variety in this collection. These are heavy topics, and yet readers turn the pages and find so many different approaches. Jacqueline Woodson writes a letter to her children, reminding them to be safe and be kind as they walk in the world. Joseph Bruchac gives advice about choosing a friend who "sees how beautiful you are, even on days when you're sad." Zetta Elliott reminds children that "You Too Can Fly." The illustrations move from painting with deep hues, to drawings with soft warm touch, to photographs showing children of different races and ethnicities.<br /><br />Above all, this collection leave me with the feeling that there are caring adults who truly see children, who know how difficult these times can be, and who admire all the ways that our children walk in this world. I'd like to leave you with a bit of Sharon Flake's letter:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"How are you, my love? Well, I hope. I've been thinking about you lately. So, I wanted to check in, to make sure you're okay. I see you...draped in confidence, walking like you own the world, looking fine, skateboarding, protesting injustice, helping out friends. My heart sings at the thought of what is possible for us here on earth because you exist."</blockquote>I definitely recommend this collection for every elementary and middle school library. I'll be bringing it to my new high school library to see what our students think of it. I purchased the review copy from my local independent bookstore, Mrs. Dalloway's. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=HqOPY3gmAOw:nJQhEFXZ10Y:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=HqOPY3gmAOw:nJQhEFXZ10Y:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=HqOPY3gmAOw:nJQhEFXZ10Y:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/HqOPY3gmAOw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/09/we-rise-we-resist-we-raise-our-voices.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-9495406220268963022018-09-04T21:30:00.000-07:002018-09-04T21:30:00.500-07:00Ivy & Bean One Big Happy Family, by Annie Barrows -- interview with Mia, age 8I am so happy to share the newest installment of <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2oJ0zB8" target="_blank">Ivy + Bean</a></b>, one of my all-time favorite series of chapter books. I love these two friends; they are goofy, full of mischief, and remind me of all the things I almost did!<br /><br />This series is perfect for readers new to chapter books. Pictures on every page help readers build a movie in their mind and keep the pacing going. Humor and friendship drama make these stories relatable and funny. The <b>Ivy + Bean</b> series fills a perfect spot in children's literature: between longer Early Readers like <b>Mercy Watson</b> and novels like <b>Ramona the Pest</b>. <br /><br /><b>Bay Area friends: </b>You'll definitely want to see Annie Barrows and Sophie Blackall on <b>Saturday, September 8th at 10am</b> at the Elmwood Theater in Berkeley, organized by Mrs. Dalloway's Books. <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ivy-and-bean-11-launch-party-with-mrs-dalloways-bookstore-tickets-48675610060" target="_blank">Get your ticket here</a> and save your spot!<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2oJ0zB8" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="1258" data-original-width="1000" height="320" src="https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-aF8R38MbXts/W49UK7HGelI/AAAAAAAASYY/vrRzOU8YVgIudlt9xhfzGuYsPO0PQE88QCLcBGAs/s320/Ivy%2B%252B%2Bbean%2Bone%2Bbig%2Bhappy%2Bfamily.jpg" width="254" /></a></div><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2oJ0zB8" target="_blank">Ivy + Bean One Big Happy Family</a></b><br />by Annie Barrows, illustrated by Sophie Blackall<br />Chronicle, 2018<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2oJ0zB8" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1019833998" target="_blank">Public library</a> / <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=QoNaDwAAQBAJ&amp;lpg=PA1&amp;dq=ivy%20bean%20family&amp;pg=PA7#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false" target="_blank">Google Books</a> preview<br />ages 6-9<br />*<a href="http://kidmode.me/search/label/best%20new%20book" target="_blank">best new book</a>*</blockquote>When I showed the newest installment to one of my favorite readers, she was thrilled to revisit her favorite book friends. So instead of a review, I'd like to share my conversation with Mia, age 8.<br /><br />Mary Ann: Hi Mia! Why were you excited to read the new Ivy &amp; Bean?<br /><br /><b>Mia</b>: I really like the series. I like that they're funny and silly. I also like that they're about real kids.<br /><br />Mary Ann: Can you tell me a little bit about this new book?<br /><br /><b>Mia</b>: Someone in their class says that only children are spoiled, and Ivy worries about this. So she tries to do lots of things to make sure she isn't spoiled. She gives away her clothes. Then she says they should get a new baby, so she won't be an only child. But the baby ends up crying and fussing so much! Then Ivy &amp; Bean decide that they should actually be twin sisters, so that Ivy isn't an only child.<br /><br />Mary Ann: Was there a part that made you laugh?<br /><br /><b>Mia</b>: It was funny when Ivy &amp; Bean tried to become twins and tied their wrists together so their skin would grow together. It was so funny because we knew it wouldn't work and they kept bonking their heads when they tried to get out of their playhouse.<br /><br />Mary Ann: Were there any other parts you liked?<br /><br /><b>Mia</b>: It was funny when Nancy was doing yoga and in downward dog. When Bean sees this, she tells Nancy that isn't what a dog looks like. Bean is really funny when she starts barking at Nancy and showing her what a dog does.<br /><br />Mary Ann: Do you think you're more like Ivy or Bean?<br /><br /><b>Mia</b>: I am really like both of them! I love reading like Ivy. I also like running around, screaming and being crazy like Bean.<br /><br />Mary Ann: Thanks so much, Mia. I really appreciate your sharing your thoughts with readers!<br /><br />Enjoy this book trailer for Ivy &amp; Bean, featuring real kids and what they think about the series:<br /><iframe allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VdkADZk1Pz8?rel=0" width="500"></iframe><br /><br />The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Chronicle. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=ARaqedDkrcA:JEc8gTQuDww:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=ARaqedDkrcA:JEc8gTQuDww:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=ARaqedDkrcA:JEc8gTQuDww:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/ARaqedDkrcA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/09/ivy-bean-one-big-happy-family-by-annie.htmltag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4979108620698271598.post-10592337027591304852018-08-29T03:30:00.000-07:002018-08-29T03:30:13.334-07:00Pipsqueaks, Slowpokes, and Stinkers : Celebrating animal underdogs, by Melissa Stewart (ages 4-8)Young readers delight in learning about new animals. If you have animal lovers in your house or classroom, definitely seek out Melissa Stewart's newest picture book: <b><a href="https://amzn.to/2BX2sDz" target="_blank">Pipsqueaks, Slowpokes, and Stinkers: Celebrating animal underdogs</a></b>. She takes a fresh look at what makes an animal noteworthy--do we really want to focus only on the fastest animals? Or do we want to find out how animals survive and thrive?<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://amzn.to/2BX2sDz" target="_blank"><img border="0" data-original-height="888" data-original-width="1000" height="355" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-PDpJIKCEP6g/W4YZR7-usLI/AAAAAAAASWg/HVIDwQprg1g88WBXxX6eHOqTqRPpCXMugCLcBGAs/s400/Pipsqueaks%252C%2BSlowpokes%252C%2Band%2BStinkers.jpg" width="400" /></a></blockquote><blockquote class="tr_bq"><b><a href="https://amzn.to/2BX2sDz" target="_blank">Pipsqueaks, Slowpokes, and Stinkers: Celebrating animal underdogs</a></b><br />by <a href="https://www.melissa-stewart.com/" target="_blank">Melissa Stewart</a>, illustrated by <a href="https://stephlaberis.carbonmade.com/" target="_blank">Stephanie Laberis</a><br /><a href="http://peachtree-online.com/portfolio-items/pipsqueaks-slowpokes-and-stinkers/" target="_blank">Peachtree</a>, 2018<br /><a href="https://amzn.to/2BX2sDz" target="_blank">Amazon</a> / <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/990248453" target="_blank">Public library</a>&nbsp;/ <a href="http://peachtree-online.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/PipsqueaksSlowpokesStinkersTG.pdf" target="_blank">Teachers guide</a><br />ages 4-8</blockquote>Stewart's lively, playful voice draws readers right into her text. We start off looking at a pair of tiny critters, the Etruscan pygmy shrew and the Amau frog. I appreciate how Stewart and Laberis help readers envision just how small these animals are by comparing them to everyday objects.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ym7Rzi_yDt8/W4YbJzzm-lI/AAAAAAAASWs/5tYYXBA4N4AEXG8Tu95-uWDXmYtK_d5mQCLcBGAs/s1600/Pipsqueaks%252C%2BSlowpokes%252C%2Band%2BStinkers_interior_Spread2.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="722" data-original-width="1600" height="180" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ym7Rzi_yDt8/W4YbJzzm-lI/AAAAAAAASWs/5tYYXBA4N4AEXG8Tu95-uWDXmYtK_d5mQCLcBGAs/s400/Pipsqueaks%252C%2BSlowpokes%252C%2Band%2BStinkers_interior_Spread2.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"Let's start with this little critter--the Etruscan pygmy shrew.<br />It's a real pipsqueak. Look, it's name is longer than its body."</td></tr></tbody></table>But the real question, as Stewart asks, is "How can these puny peewees survive?" Turn the page, and readers will see dramatic examples of how being tiny can actually help you hide from predators.<br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-rnzmcyAMLv0/W4YcKa3HItI/AAAAAAAASW4/xfC03mF_coMTRQHLheftOSEdk2kgpbNtACLcBGAs/s1600/Pipsqueaks%252C%2BSlowpokes%252C%2Band%2BStinkers_interior_Spread3.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" data-original-height="722" data-original-width="1600" height="180" src="https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-rnzmcyAMLv0/W4YcKa3HItI/AAAAAAAASW4/xfC03mF_coMTRQHLheftOSEdk2kgpbNtACLcBGAs/s400/Pipsqueaks%252C%2BSlowpokes%252C%2Band%2BStinkers_interior_Spread3.jpg" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">"Believe it or not,<br />size is on their side."</td></tr></tbody></table>Stewart presents an engaging look at a range of animals, helping young children think about what characteristics might help animals survive. The backmatter includes more information, but she keeps it quite brief. Instead, she focuses on encouraging children to think about different animals. This would be a terrific discussion-starter for talking about habitats and animal characteristics.<br /><br />I especially appreciate the gentle message Stewart provides throughout, that every animal has “its own special way of surviving" and we need to recognize the strengths each has just the way they are. Take special note of the dedication at the end of the book:<br /><blockquote class="tr_bq">"For any child who is being bullied right now---<br />what others see as a weakness may actually be your strength.<br /><br />Don’t give up."</blockquote>I have long admired <a href="https://www.melissa-stewart.com/" target="_blank">Melissa Stewart</a>'s nonfiction books for children and appreciated her thoughtful writing about the craft of writing nonfiction. She helpfully examines different types of nonfiction writing (see her recent article <a href="https://slj.com/?detailStory=understanding-teaching-five-kinds-nonfiction" target="_blank">Understanding—and Teaching—the Five Kinds of Nonfiction</a>, published in the <b>School Library Journal</b>). I encourage you to explore her helpful blog, <b><a href="http://celebratescience.blogspot.com/" target="_blank">Celebrate Science</a></b>.<br /><br />Illustrations copyright ©2018 Stephanie Laberis, shared by permission of the publisher. The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Peachtree Publishers. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.<br /><br /><b>©2018 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books</b><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=2PBdJJJGmxo:41CEJdLroiU:63t7Ie-LG7Y"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=63t7Ie-LG7Y" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=2PBdJJJGmxo:41CEJdLroiU:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?a=2PBdJJJGmxo:41CEJdLroiU:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/GreatKidBooks?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/GreatKidBooks/~4/2PBdJJJGmxo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>Mary Ann Scheuerhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/09592162867997740561noreply@blogger.com0http://kidmode.me/2018/08/pipsqueaks-slowpokes-and-stinkers.html