Showing posts with label Cybils 2012. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cybils 2012. Show all posts

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Hooray for the Cybils!! Winners are announced today!

Each year I turn to the Cybils Awards to learn about books that kids are really going to like, and that are really well written. These awards specifically choose books that meet both criteria. As they write on the Cybils website,
"If some la-di-dah awards can be compared to brussel sprouts, and other, more populist ones to gummy bears, we’re thinking more like organic chicken nuggets. We’re yummy and nutritious."
For the past two years, I have had the great honor of working with the Cybils team to organize the Cybils Book App Awards. We have carefully considered over 80 nominated books apps, looking at storyline, interactive features, narration, illustrations, and overall child appeal. This award stands out for considering the literary merit of book apps, not just their technical achievements.

Today, the winning books are announced and I couldn't be happier! Our round 1 judges chose an excellent panel of finalists, and the round 2 judges agreed that one app rose to the top:
Dragon Brush
by Andy Hullinger and John Solimine
developed by Small Planet Digital
winner of the 2012 Cybils Book App Award
ages 4 - 8
available on iTunes
What would you paint if you had a magic paintbrush? Would you paint all the riches you might want? But what might happen if an evil lord tries to steal this away? Dragon Brush takes children into this scene, using interactive features to draw children along but never overwhelming the story.

Dragon Brush embodies all that the Cybils stands for: an excellent story that draws children back to it again and again. Children are fascinated with the interactive features, revealing the intricate paintings that magically come to life, and finding each of the hidden inkpots.

I want to send a special thanks to our wonderful team of judges: Alyson Beecher, Sara Bryce, Helen Dineen, Carisa Kluver, Elisabeth LeBris, Lalitha Nataraj, Cathy Potter, Melissa Wiley and Paula Willey. Each one added thoughtful comments and we all learned so much from one another. I feel lucky to have so many colleagues throughout the blogging world helping me explore this wonderful world of book apps.

All of the Cybils winners are fantastic. Take some time to peruse this wonderful resource and find great books to share with your kids. Read about other book apps here on my blog, Great Kid Books.

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

Rounds: Franklin Frog - a book app for young children (ages 3-6)

Young children are drawn to picture book apps that combine narration, interactive features and appealing illustrations. But really, it's the story that counts. Does it engage children? Do they want to find out what happens next? Do they want to read it again the next day? Our students have really enjoyed reading Franklin Frog, the first story in the Rounds series by Nosy Crow.
Rounds: Franklin Frog
by Barry and Emma Tranter
developed by Nosy Crow
preview video
available on iTunes
2013 Cybils Book App award finalist
ages 3 - 6
This book app does a beautiful job introducing preschoolers and kindergartners to real facts about frogs, from their habitat to feeding to metamorphosis, through an appealing story about Franklin Frog and his offspring. It draws children into the story, as they guide the frogs with their fingers. Children make the frogs jump, swim, catch flies, avoid predators, find a place to hibernate, croak to attract a mate and more.

The Rounds series introduces young children to animals' life cycles from infancy through adulthood, onto reproduction and childrearing. The stories then follow the main characters' children, going round and round again. Here, children first meet Franklin Frog, and then his mate Felicity Frog. From one of their eggs, a new frogspawn hatches and the story begins again following young Frasier Frog.

This app always feels like an exploration of how a frog lives, and never feels like a game. The interactions focus on exploring the way frogs move, avoid herons (see below), eat insects and find mates. As the Horn Book review says, this app presents the information in "an accessible way that’s respectful of both its subject and its audience."


School Library Journal recently included Franklin Frog in their best apps for January 2013. They wrote, "With its simple activities and circular format, this colorful app is bound to keep young children engaged through several frog generations. ... A delightful balance between educational and entertaining."

Enjoy this video to get a sense of how this book shares so much information through a sweet story:



Check out more 2012 Cybils finalists to find great books to read with your kids. The 2012 Cybils winners will be announced on February 14th!

Review ©2013 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

Sunday, January 6, 2013

Bats! Furry Fliers of the Night, by Mary Kay Carson - a fantastic nonfiction book app (ages 6 - 10)

Nonfiction book apps are shining stars in the 2012 Cybils book app finalists. In fact, if you look "Best of 2012" lists from Kirkus Reviews and School Library Journal, you'll find several interesting examples of book apps that share facts and information with young readers. The best of these integrate well written nonfiction text, vibrant full-color photographs and videos, interactive features that help students experiment and engage with the topics, and narration that makes the content accessible for a wide range of children.


Mary Kay Carson's Bats! Furry Fliers of the Night has wowed students at Emerson since it was released in January 2012. They love the way it pulls them into the nighttime scene, immersing readers in the world of the bats.
Bats: Furry Fliers in the Night
by Mary Kay Carson
developed by Bookerella and StoryWorldwide
2012 Cybils Book App Award finalist
ages 6-10
available on iTunes
Bats! is an original book app written by Mary Kay Carson, a prolific nonfiction author who also wrote The Bat Scientists as part of the Scientists in the Field series. She layers clear text with interesting diagrams, photographs, and interactive features. The diagram on the right highlights the body part as you tap the label. While this seems like a fairly simple step, it reinforces young children's understanding of clear nonfiction text features.

The design elements are top-notch, providing just the right amount of zing to keep kids engaged without distracting them at all from the essence of the material. Below you see the "Wheel of Bats" which readers spin to find out more information about different bats.


As Cathy Potter, of The Nonfiction Detectives, writes in her review for the Cybils,
With an effective blend of traditional nonfiction features and innovative interactive elements, Bats! offers young readers many opportunities to learn about these furry nocturnal fliers. Children will enjoy learning about the physical features, behaviors and habitats of bats through clear text, photographs, captions, diagrams and maps. Readers tap diagrams to make wings flap, tilt the iPad to steer a bat in flight, spin the "Wheel of Bats," and search for hidden bats in various habitats.


The vivid animation of bats flying in the night sky coupled with sound effects from nature (bat wings flapping, wind howling, water babbling, and bats screeching) give readers the sense they are watching live bats in the wild. Children will have a ball learning about science in this high quality nonfiction app.
This book trailer will give you a feel for the way Bats! brings young readers into the nighttime world of these flying mammals:



As fellow panelist Paula Willey writes on her blog PinkMe, Bats! is "a terrific nonfiction app, with beautiful sharp photos and animations that enhance understanding of the subject." I couldn't agree more.

Check out more 2012 Cybils finalists to find great books to read with your kids. The 2012 Cybils winners will be announced on February 14th!

Review ©2013 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Dragon Brush - a magical book app set in ancient China (ages 4 - 8)

Some of the best interactive storybook apps show children that magical leap from the ordinary into a magical world. Dragon Brush, a finalist in the 2012 Cybils Book App Award, weaves a story based on a Chinese folktale that keeps children coming back to it again and again.
Dragon Brush
by Andy Hullinger and John Solimine
developed by Small Planet Digital
winner of the 2012 Cybils Book App Award
ages 4 - 8
available on iTunes
What would you paint if you had a magic paintbrush? Would you paint all the riches you might want? But what might happen if an evil lord tries to steal this away? Dragon Brush takes children into this scene, using interactive features to draw children along but never overwhelming the story.

As Cathy Potter, of The Nonfiction Detectives, writes in her review of Dragon Brush for the Cybils,
An old woman gives young Bing-Wen a magic paintbrush made from a dragon’s whiskers in this imaginative original story. Bing-Wen uses the paintbrush to paint a chicken to provide food for his family, a tree to grow fruit for the village, and a comical dragon that isn’t very fierce.

Children will enjoy wiping their fingers across the screen to reveal intricate paintings that come to life. Readers will cheer when the clever Bing-Wen outwits the greedy emperor and teaches him a lesson. Soft guitar music, effective narration, kid-friendly illustrations, and bits of added humor bring a whimsical feeling to this app. A dragon, a greedy emperor, hidden inkpots, and artwork that comes to life…this is an app with kid appeal, for sure!
Dragon Brush embodies all that the Cybils stands for: an excellent story that draws children back to it again and again. Children are fascinated with the interactive features, revealing the intricate paintings that magically come to life, and finding each of the hidden inkpots.


But the story resonates with heart and kindness as Bing-Wen discovers the true gift of artwork - creating a gift for those you love.  The artwork, narration and background music complement the story. The characters have a cartoon appeal but the style is restrained and appropriate to the folktale setting in ancient China. As you can see in the trailer, the music and narration by Mark Berninger and Aaron Dessner, of the band The National, gives the app a soothing feel.

Enjoy this trailer for Dragon Brush:


Dragon Brush from Small Planet Digital on Vimeo.

As Andy Hullinger writes on his website, "Sharing a story and bringing the images life with your imagination is a special kind of magic all its own. This is the heart of Dragon Brush, especially if you have an iPad. Be sure to try it together, With a little one snuggled next to you, mute the narration and read aloud for them as they touch and tap to move the story along." My only wish is that the authors provided a little more information about the folktale that inspired their story.

Review ©2013 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

Tuesday, January 1, 2013

The Voyage of Ulysses, by Elastico Srl - an enchanting, accessible book app (ages 9 - 12)

The Voyage of Ulysses, a gripping app for tweens based on Homer's classic Odyssey, is a finalist for the 2012 Cybils Book App Award.

The Odyssey, Homer's classic tale of adventure, longing and struggle, is at once utterly gripping and hard to digest for many of today's children. I remember trying to teach this epic poem to a class of urban 9th graders - this hero's journey felt far away from their reality. The Voyage of Ulysses, a book app developed by the Italian company Elastico Srl, makes this classic story accessible for middle grade children while staying true to the original story.
The Voyage of Ulysses
developed by Elastic Srl
2012 Cybils Book App Award finalist
nominated by Viktor Sjöberg
ages 9 - 12
available through iTunes App Store
As Paula Willey of PinkMe writes in her review for the Cybils Award,
With pathos and romance, the Odyssey is at once a gripping story and a fascinating look at how people long ago lived their lives. In twenty-four screens, mirroring the traditional 24 books of the Odyssey, this book app tells the story of Ulysses's ten-year travail on his way home from the Trojan War.
Spellbinding, slightly accented narration continues while we explore the delights of each page - arrows that rain from the ramparts of Troy, Greek warriors creeping from the giant horse and setting Troy ablaze, text that spins into the whirlpool Charybdis. Understated art, music, and sound effects match the lyrical, timeless style of the text, while pull-up sidebars provide even more information. A truly engaging app that also succeeds in communicating the themes of loneliness and exile that make Homer's epic emotionally arresting three thousand years later.
This is an excellent example of a book app for older readers that uses effective narration controlled interactive features to draw readers in. The distinct chapters kept the pacing of Ulysses' journey moving clearly toward his homecoming. The interactive features were enough to keep the reader engaged without ever taking them off-task or off-track. I loved the interactive map (on the right) that you could use to explore Ulysses' journey.

Enjoy a quick taste of the app in this book trailer / preview:



Share this book app with fans of the Percy Jackson series, Greek mythology and epic journeys. I hope this app reaches a wide audience in the US. So many of our stories continue to draw on Homer's quintessential hero's journey - we need to keep sharing it with children. This a fantastic example of an international app that appeals across cultures.

Review ©2013 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

2012 Cybils Book Apps Finalists - a fantastic group of apps to explore!

I am so excited to announce the finalists for the 2012 Cybils Book Apps Award. The Cybils Award recognizes books for children and young adults that combine both excellent literary quality and high kid appeal. I am honored to serve as the category organizer for the Book Apps category.

Here are this year's finalists for the 2012 Cybils Book Apps Award! Here is our full list of finalists, with links to the apps. This week I will share more about each of these apps. For a full description today, head over to the Cybils website.

Bats! Furry Fliers of the Night
written by Mary Kay Carson
developed by Bookerella and StoryWorldwide, 2012
nominated by Cathy Potter

Dragon Brush
created by John Solimine and Andy Hullinger
developed by Small Planet Digital
nominated by Aurora Celeste

Rounds: Franklin Frog
written by Emma Tranter
illustrated by Barry Tranter
developed by Nosy Crow
nominated by Danielle Smith

The Voyage of Ulysses
based on the epic by Homer
developed by Elastic Srl
nominated by Viktor Sjöberg

Where Do Balloons Go? An Uplifting Story
written by Jamie Lee Curtis
illustrated by Laura Cornell
developed by Auryn, Inc.
nominated by Teresa Garcia

Our fantastic team of judges debated long and thoughtfully to come up with this list of finalists. We evaluated over 80 book apps, ranging from picture books for the very youngest readers to nonfiction apps developed for young adults. We sought to highlight the full range of apps that are being produced, recognizing those that integrate text, illustrations, narration, animation and interactive features to produce an engaging reading experience.

I want to thank all of the round one Book App judges: Cathy Potter, Paula Willey, Carisa Kluver and Lalitha Nataraj. They all contributed so much, bringing different perspectives and experiences to our deliberations. I am so grateful for their time and thoughtful conversations about these apps. I am also so very grateful to the whole Cybils team for their support and exploration of this new way of sharing books with children. I hope you all enjoy these book apps with your children!

Head over to the Cybils website to learn more about these five fantastic book apps for children. This week, I will share more about each one of them. Over the next six weeks, the fabulous round two judges will select one winner from these apps - to be announced on February 14th.

©2013 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

Monday, December 17, 2012

Nonfiction Book Apps for a range of readers (ages 3 - 18)

I am fascinated by the way that book apps can engage readers by integrating so many different ways of learning. You can look at vibrant photographs, manipulate charts and diagrams, watch videos, listen to narration and learn so much. I've been particularly happy to read several Nonfiction Book Apps during this Cybils season. Here are a few that really stand out to me:
Rounds: Franklin Frog
by Barry and Emma Tranter
developed by Nosy Crow
preview video
available on iTunes
ages 3 - 6
Young children love learning about the world around them. This app does a beautiful job introducing preschoolers and kindergartners to real facts about frogs, from their habitat to feeding to metamorphosis, through an appealing story about Franklin Frog and his offspring. It draws children into the story, as they guide the frogs with their fingers. Children make the frogs jump, swim, catch flies, avoid predators, find a place to hibernate, croak to attract a mate and more. This app always feels like an exploration of how a frog lives, and never feels like a game. As the Horn Book review says, this app presents the information in "an accessible way that’s respectful of both its subject and its audience."

National Geographic Adventure Presents The Greatest Stories Ever Told
developed by National Geographic Society
preview video
available on iTunes
ages 9 - 14
Every time I read and explore this app, I am utterly amazed at the adventures these stories share. This app features five amazing stories ranging from mountain climbing in Yosemite to crossing the Antarctic by dogsled to climbing down into a volcano. Each story hooks readers with a short video, but then encourages them to read beyond this initial video to learn more. Text is interspersed with high quality photographs and interactive graphics. Readers scroll in different ways, vertically and horizontally - this keeps readers stimulated and engaged. The interactive graphics let you discover more - for example, a timeline with a sliding bar lets readers explore the different types of climbing gear used over the past 100 years. But most of all, I was impressed with the way readers got a sense of the real people involved through quotes, video and audio. It conveys a first-hand point of view in an exciting, engaging format.
Wonders of Geology
by Michael Collier
developed by Mikaya Press/Tasa Graphic Arts
a "Top 10 App" from School Library Journal
available on iTunes
ages 10 - 14
The Wonders of Geology combines stunning photography, clear descriptions, and a combination of text and audio narration to teach tweens and teens about how the Earth's great mountains, valleys and other geological features were formed. Collier's breathtaking photographs draw readers in and convey a sense of awe at the wonders of these spectacular sites. The app switches between concise written paragraphs that introduce a subject and longer narrated segments as viewers look at photographs or diagrams. This helps tweens and teens who are curious about a topic but perhaps not determined enough to read in-depth nonfiction text to learn more about the subject. Collier shares his passion and in-depth knowledge of geology, as well as his stunning photographs. While some students may want more interactive features, I believe that others with an interest in the subject will be fascinated. It would make an excellent complement to a standard textbook for 6th graders studying Earth Science.
Animated diagram from Wonders of Geology
Brian Cox's Wonders of the Universe
by Brian Cox
developed by Harper Collins UK and The Other Media
ages 16 to adult
available on iTunes
Particle physicist Brian Cox brings astrophysics to a general audience with the amazing Wonders of the Universe app, bringing together his books Wonders of the Solar System and Wonders of the Universe with his award-winning TV series produced by the BBC. The app uses all of the features of the iPad, drawing readers in with personable, engaging video, clearly written text and interesting diagrams. The journey up from the smallest particles, past the moons and planets of the Solar System, out to the outer edges of the known universe truly blows my mind. I find myself in utter awe that scientists can understand, test and prove this knowledge. As The Other Media's managing director George Crabb says in a Guardian article, "We threw out conventional thinking on multimedia experiences to instead come up with a revolutionary platform that can take complex narratives but deliver them with an intuitive clarity." This is an app for older high school students and adults who are fascinated by physics and astronomy, and who want to explore how multimedia technology can help us understand these subjects. I must admit that I do not understand all of what I am reading in this app, but I am fascinated nonetheless!

Wonders of the Universe combines text and video
Nonfiction Book Apps show that this media has great potential for drawing readers into interesting topics. I am glad that several were nominated for the Cybils Award this year. Tune in on January 1st to the Cybils website to find out which apps are chosen for this year's shortlist.

The apps reviewed here came from both promotional codes sent by the developers and our school app library. The Berkeley Public Education Fund has graciously supported our school as we explore how apps help children learn and engage with a range of books.

Review ©2012 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

Monday, October 29, 2012

Scary books for struggling readers (ages 9 - 12)

Do you know a kid who bounces from book to book, never really settling into a story? Several of my students struggle with picking books. They can't find ones that interest them that are at their reading level. One of my 5th graders, Carl, has tried out a new series and loves it: Return to the Library of Doom. He's sharing it with his friends, and it's spreading through his class.

Return to the Library of Doom, by Michael Dahl, is a series designed for older students who still struggle with reading. The sentences are short, direct and clear. The action moves at a fast pace, with little distracting descriptions. There is plenty of spacing between lines, so kids can track the words easily. Best of all, from their point of view, the stories are creepy and exciting, filled with bold illustrations that remind them of the comic books they love.
Killer App
Return to the Library of Doom
by Michael Dahl
illustrated by Bradford Kendall
Capstone / Stone Arch, 2012
ages 9 - 12
available on Amazon and your local library
Google Book preview
My favorite in the series is Killer App. When Carl first read this, he said to his teacher that it's the best book he's ever read. That's saying a whole lot from Carl, a whole lot.
Four teens are driving along a desert highway when one shows his girlfriend an app that sends him "really FREAKY horror stories." When they start to download one, they notice a black cloud of ravens headed toward them.
"The dark cloud grows larger and larger. Savage screams pierce the air."
This type of direct writing pulls in students who want a suspenseful story, but who cannot wade through long descriptions. The design of the book also draws in my 5th graders. They love the illustrations, the drawings on the words, the whole look and feel of the books is "cool." And that coolness factor counts a lot, especially for kids who don't think reading is very cool. Take a look at one of the pages from the Google Preview:


In the next chapter, a group of motorcyclists find the phone next to the abandoned car covered with scratches. The mystery builds as these kids try to escape the ravens and hide in an deserted gas station. I enjoyed its inventive twist of modern technology, the frightening gore of attacking birds, and the references to classic movies and books. I laughed when the Librarian saved the day, saying, "Only horror can defeat horror."

This series will hook readers, it will keep them glued to the pages. Dahl's writing does not provide much character development, but his stories can provide the structure for students to practice active reading skills. Watching my 5th graders pass them from friend to friend makes this Librarian smile.

Carl and I nominated Killer App for the Cybils Early Chapter Book Award. The Lexile level of this book is 380, and the Guided Reading Level is an L. While the reading level is appropriate for students reading at a 2nd grade level, it is designed for 4th through 8th graders.

The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Capstone / Stone Arch Books. We so appreciate their supporting our readers as they seek out new, exciting series to share with their friends. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books (at no cost to you!). Thank you for your support.

Review ©2012 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

Sunday, October 7, 2012

Nominate a BOOK APP for the Cybils Award TODAY!

Last year, the Cybils Awards launched the first BOOK APP AWARD for children and young adults. The Cybils Awards are given each year by bloggers for the year's best children's and young adult titles. Anyone can nominate a book between October 1st and October 15th. That means you have one more week to nominate your favorite book app that was published last year.

Head here to nominate a book for the Cybils Award!

Findability is a huge problem when it comes to book apps. What are the most recent apps published? What will appeal to my children? I often turn to the Kirkus Reviews site to explore their in-depth reviews of book apps. Here are some book apps that they have recommended this year. I have not read all of these apps, but I have read enough of Kirkus Reviews' recommendations to know they are worth exploring.

Check out these other wish lists from great bloggers and judges for the Cybils Book App Awards:
  • PinkMe's Electronic Thursday - Paula focuses specifically on some fascinating nonfiction book apps. My students are still fascinated by last year's finalist Bobo Explores Light, and so we will definitely be checking some of these out.
  • Masala Readers Cybils Wishlist - Lalitha has some great apps to recommend, with a focus on picture book apps ranging from sweet ones like Leah and the Owl to the funny The House that Went on Strike.

Here are some apps I'm investigating from Kirkus reviews. All quotes and links are from the Kirkus Reviews site.
  • Franklin Frog, from the "Round" series, published by Nosy Crow. "This first installment in Nosy Crow’s new Rounds series of biology apps for preschoolers is actually a hybrid of sorts. The story offers plenty of frog facts... but there’s also fictional banter that gives the frogs a bit of character."
  • The Voyage of Ulysses, developed by Elastico SRL. "This slimmed, prose version of Homer’s epic can be read aloud by a lilting narrator, or it can be read silently. All of the characters Ulysses meets on his long journey home are here...with a suitable amount of smoothly written text material to flesh out their backgrounds and roles."
  • Dragon Brush, by Andy Hulling, developed by Small Planet Digital. "The story of a magical dragon brush that can bring painted objects to life casts its own spell. Bing-Wen, a slender rabbit from a poor family, loves to paint. His luck turns when he helps an old woman with an overturned cart and is awarded a paintbrush made from the whiskers of a dragon."
  • B.B. Wolf, by Debbie Fong. "A revised 'Little Red Riding Hood,' with unusually simple and effective illustrations and interactive features. Fong suspends small figures drawn in thin, scribbly lines... creating narrative movement for her retelling with one or two discreet spiral buttons in each scene."
  • Leonard, by Ink Robin. "A move from the city to the country leaves Leonard... (asking): Where are all the new friends? As readers join him in his search, Leonard’s imagination takes off full force, taking him into the jungle and soaring into outer space." (my review here)
  • The Artifacts, by Lynley Stace, developed by Slap Happy Larry. "This beautiful, resonant story about the way we leave behind childish things (but never really abandon them) delivers a specific, potent experience unusual even for the best iPad apps." (highly recommended by Cybils panelist Carisa Kluver - see her review here)

Please take the time to nominate a book app for the Cybils Awards. All nominations from the public must be received by October 15th!

©2012 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

Sunday, September 30, 2012

Cybils nominations start tomorrow - share your favorites!

The Cybils awards are given each year by bloggers for the year's best children's and young adult titles. Nominations for the 2012 Cybils open just after the stroke of midnight (Pacific time) as Sunday turns into Monday. Anyone can nominate and it's a really great thing to do. I'd love to encourage more families and kids to nominate their favorite books.

Anyone may nominate one book per genre between October 1st - 15th. This year, the Cybils organizers have tried to make the form mobile-friendly - from my beta testing, it works great! Sheila Ruth did amazing things creating this nomination form.

The Cybils Awards are given for books in the following categories (these links take you to the category description):
Do you have favorites that immediately come to mind? I was just going over with my students the books they've read since the beginning of the year - it's such a great thing to do. Take a moment and reflect on all the reading you and your children have done this past year. Do any new books stand out? Nominate them!

What books are eligible for this contest? Any English or bilingual books published in the U.S. or Canada between the end of one contest and start of another. For 2012, that means books released between Oct. 16, 2011 and Oct. 15, 2012. Books must be specifically published for the children’s or young adult market.

Nominations run from October 1st to 15th for the public. Publishers have been asked to wait until after that to nominate any books that might have been overlooked. So head over to the Cybils site starting Monday, October 1st and nominate your favorite book that's been published in the past year.

Full disclosure: I am the Chair of the Book Apps Cybils Committee. I love this award and have been honored to be part of this organization. It's run by a dedicated group of volunteers who write blogs about children's and YA books.

Mary Ann